Toupee-wearing, 'degenerate' lawyer sues Wolf

Last updated 13:16 21/02/2014
P.J. Byrne

SUING: Lawyer Andrew Greene isn't happy to be portrayed by P.J. Byrne in The Wolf of Wall Street.

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A lawyer has sued Paramount Pictures and the makers of The Wolf of Wall Street for US$25 million (NZ$30 million) in damages, saying he is portrayed as a toupee-wearing, degenerate drug user in the Oscar-nominated film.

Andrew Greene, of New York, also wants the film based on the memoir of stock swindler Jordan Belfort, to be removed from theaters.

Greene claims the character of Nicky "Rugrat" Koskoff in the movie directed by Martin Scorsese was repeatedly ridiculed about his toupee and is shown as a person having no moral or ethical values.

"The motion picture introduces 'Rugrat' by referencing his "piece of shit hairpiece," according to the federal lawsuit filed in New York.

"In another scene, investigators ask whether his hair is real. Characters are also seen attempting to grab the toupee in a scene," it added.

Greene also takes offense to his character being portrayed "as a criminal, drug user, degenerate, depraved, and/or devoid of any morality or ethics," according to the court papers.

Viacom Inc-owned Paramount Pictures said it had no comment when contacted about the lawsuit.

Actor P.J. Byrne plays the character based on Greene in the film that has been nominated for five Oscars, including best picture, best director for Scorsese and best actor for DiCaprio, who plays Belfort.

Greene, whose nickname according to the court papers was "Wigwam," was a childhood friend of Belfort, who made a fortune by defrauding clients during the 1990s.

Greene served on the board of directors of Stratton Oakmont and was the head of its finance department.

Aaron Goldsmith, Greene's lawyer, said in a interview that his client "attempted to create an environment of compliance and regulatory oversight," while he was at the company.

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