Blu-ray review: Tucker & Dale vs Evil

CHRIS PHILPOTT
Last updated 15:07 27/11/2011
Tucker
TUCKER & DALE VS EVIL: A film that packs the laughs.

Relevant offers

DVD reviews

Blu-ray review: The Hobbit- The Desolation of Smaug 3D Blu-ray review: Rush Blu-ray review: The World's End DVD review: The Hunger Games - Catching Fire DVD review: Don Jon DVD review: Pete Smalls is Dead Blu-ray review: The Butler DVD review: Beyond The Edge Blu-ray review: Gravity DVD review: Lovelace

REVIEW: Some of the most successful horror movies ever made - especially the more recent torture-porn variety - follow a specific formula: a group of people (often high school kids) go to a remote location and are terrorised by some mysterious psychopath who proceeds to kill them all.

But what do we really know about these mysterious psychopaths? And is it possible that, from the killers' perspective, it's all just a gross misunderstanding?

That question is at the centre of Tucker & Dale vs Evil, a bloody good comedy (pun intended) that inverts the horror formula to tell its story from the perspective of that misunderstood psychopath.

Or pair of misunderstood psychopaths, as the case may be.

The result is the generic horror equivalent of Shaun of The Dead. Tucker & Dale is a film that packs the laughs in while shining a light on some of the more ridiculous clichés of the horror genre, using its rural West Virginia setting to full effect by placing much of the action in the woods (as well as parodying the likes of Friday the 13).

With a cast led by Alan Tudyk (Firefly) and Tyler Labine (currently appearing on TV's Mad Love), Tucker & Dale vs Evil is a funny and entertaining romp through a genre that is ripe for parody. Make sure you watch it with the lights out.

Director: Eli Craig
Starring:
Alan Tudyk, Tyler Labine, Katrina Bowden
Special Features include: cast & crew interviews, photo gallery, trailer.

Ad Feedback

- © Fairfax NZ News

Comments

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content

Reeling

Reeling - Margaret Agnew on movies

Enough about quakes, back to movies