Singing nun heads to The Voice finals

Last updated 09:26 05/06/2014
Fairfax Australia

Sister Cristina says she's hoping the Pope will get in touch, after the young nun became an instant hit with her rendition of Alicia Keys' No One on The Voice of Italy.

Sister Cristina Scuccia
LIVING ON A PRAYER: Sister Cristina Scuccia

Relevant offers


Pope Francis drops some 'papal beats' in new #popebars meme The Grammys welcome Auckland duo The Claxtons They're on their way: Proclaimers to play Hamilton Taylor Swift flies mum and brother to join her in Queenstown, goes on road trip Pope Francis releases heavenly rock album McLaren Falls Festival would've succeeded, says organiser Adele eclipses Taylor Swift to take command of the pop world Sinead O'Connor blames music, family and custody battle for her overdose Hasselhoff and Colonel Sanders among weirdest Christmas albums At 82 Brian Hawkins is still rocking to the beat and ready for AC/DC's concert

A singing nun who has charmed audiences across Italy with romping renditions of Alicia Keys' No One and Cyndi Lauper's Girls Just Want To Have Fun heads into the finals of a TV talent show as an unusual front-runner.

With her full habit, sensible shoes and cheering nuns in her camp, Sister Cristina Scuccia made it to the finals of the Italian version of The Voice after capturing attention - and millions of YouTube viewers - with her first-round performance in March.

In that show, The Voice judges couldn't see Scuccia, making their selection all the more surprising once they turned their chairs around and found the 25-year-old nun belting out the Keys classic.

At a news conference on the eve of the finals, Scuccia said that even if she wins, her religious superiors would decide what she does.

"No one has won yet and there are still four of us competing, but regardless of how I do, my superiors make decisions about my future," she was quoted as saying by Italian news agencies. "I'd be happy to go back to singing in chapel with the children."

If she gets a record contract, Scuccia said she would continue with her religious vocation.

"I'd never renounce the biggest love of my life, the calling that I have had," she was quoted as saying. "Absolutely not."

Scuccia has made one request, however, saying after her first-round win that she'd love to hear from Pope Francis. The pope, who is known for making cold calls, hasn't rung her up yet.

Scuccia is not the world's first "singing nun"; that title belongs to Jeanine Deckers, a member of the Dominican Order in Belgium. At the height of her fame she was known as "the Singing Nun".

Deckers early life was dramatised in a 1966 film, The Singing Nun, which starred Debbie Reynolds. Now who will play Scuccia in her biopic? 

Ad Feedback

- AP

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content