Weird Al's grammar gaffe in Word Crimes song

Last updated 14:36 16/07/2014
Al Yankovic

OOPSIE: There's an error in Weird Al Yankovic's grammar-themed Blurred Lines parody.

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Weird Al Yankovic is so busy ripping pop stars apart with his musical parodies that he didn't notice his own mistake in his latest pop send up.

In Word Crimes, Yankovic's parody of Robin Thicke's Blurred Lines, the comedian is so busy preaching about grammatical errors that he, ironically, doesn't notice his own.

Just over three minutes into the song, Yankovic uses a glaring split infinitive when he sings: "Try your best to not drool".

But it didn't take long for the internet to spot it on the very day he released the video.

The website crushable, quickly devoted a whole page to talking about the grammatical error.

In the rest of the song, Yankovic then claims he's going to try to "educate ya", but it's hard to take education advice from a guy who lands a split infinitive into a song about grammatical errors.

To give Yankovic the benefit of the doubt, there are some pretty handy tips in there. He sings about when to use an apostrophe, what a contraction is and tells his listeners they should know when to use "less" or "fewer".

But hearing that refrain "I hate these Word Crimes" is hard to take seriously when he makes his own glaring grammatical error mistake.

Perhaps he meant it ironically, so let's give Weird Al the benefit of the doubt and say that he did because at least he has the ability to make us laugh.

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- AAP

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