My Chemical Romance shun Twilight

Last updated 13:48 23/11/2010
Gerard Way
Getty Images
DARK DAYS: My Chemical Romance frontman Gerard Way says the band didn't want to be part of the Twilight soundtrack because they hate what the image of goths has become.

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My Chemical Romance shunned the Twilight soundtrack because they hated what the image of a goth had become.

Lead singer Gerard Way has admitted the band were offered a lot of money to produce a song for the Twilight album but turned it down because he felt the eyeliner look had been hijacked by mainstream companies wanting to capitalise on the image.

The singer said the group's new album, entitled Danger Days: The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys, is in protest about the fact that the punk-come-goth image has been used as a marketing tool.

"That's why this record exists, to react against all of that," Way told NME magazine. "That's why the song Vampire Money is on there, because there's a lot of people chasing that f**king money. Twilight? A lot of people around us were like 'Please, for the love of God, do this f**king movie.' But we'd moved on."

The Twilight film saga is based on a series of books written by Stephenie Meyer about a human who falls in love with a brooding vampire.

Way, 33, explained that the band used to dress in dark clothing and wear make-up to be controversial. However, since television shows like True Blood and films like Twilight have invoked the image it has lost its appeal to him.

"Originally what we did was take goth and put it with punk and turn it into something dangerous and sexy," he said. "Back then no one in the normal world was wearing black clothes, eyeliner...We did it because we had one mission, to polarise, to irritate, to contaminate...But then that image gets romanticised. And then it gets commoditised."

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