Battle over Happy Birthday song

Last updated 17:50 14/06/2013

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Makers of a documentary about the song Happy Birthday to You are suing a major recording company over copyright to the jingle, called the most famous song in the English language.

They are also seeking damages and restitution of more than $5 million in licensing fees collected by Warner/Chappell Music Inc from thousands of people and groups who've paid it licensing fees.

Good Morning To You Productions Corp, which is working on a film tentatively titled Happy Birthday, argues in a lawsuit filed in New York Thursday that the song should be "dedicated to public use and in the public domain".

"More than 120 years after the melody to which the simple lyrics of Happy Birthday to You is set was first published, defendant Warner/Chappell boldly, but wrongfully and unlawfully, insists that it owns the copyright to Happy Birthday to You," the lawsuit states.

The film company filed the lawsuit after having to pay Warner/Chappell a $1500 licensing fee and sign an agreement to use the song in a scene - or face a $150,000 penalty.

The suit asks the court to count thousands of people and groups who've paid Warner/Chappell Music licensing fees as part of a class action and to make the song free to use.

Warner/Chappell, based in Los Angeles, claims exclusive copyright to Happy Birthday to You, which Guinness World Records has called the most famous song in the English language.

The company, whose artists include Aretha Franklin, Barry Gibb, Rob Zombie, Madonna and Michael Jackson, didn't immediately respond to a request for comment Thursday.

Good Morning To You Productions argues that evidence dating to 1893 helps show the song's copyright expired around 1921. It says four previous copyrights to the melody of the similar-sounding song Good Morning to All, filed in 1893, 1896, 1899 and 1907, have expired or been forfeited.

The suit says that Warner/Chappell claims the exclusive copyright to the song based on piano arrangements published in 1935 but that the copyright applies only to the piano arraignment and not to the melody or lyrics.

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- AP

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