Lorde credits her success to the internet

Last updated 05:00 04/04/2014
Lorde
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GOLDEN GIRL: Lorde holds up her two Grammys after the awards show in January.

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Lorde thinks the internet can allow people to achieve whatever they want to.

The 17-year-old Royals singer won two Grammy Awards this year and her debut studio album Pure Heroine went either platinum or gold in over eight countries following its September 2013 release.

Lorde's first EP The Love Club was posted on SoundCloud in 2012, and she credits her great success to internet sharing culture.

"There are very few limits on what can be achieved by anyone of any age, living anywhere and of any race, because of the web...I'm proof of that," she revealed in Fashion magazine's May 2014 issue.

Lorde is convinced the internet has changed human communication in ways that call for more authenticity.

The teenager thinks most kids today are digitally adept and able to formulate more shrewd opinions about mainstream events.

"I think young people have changed the way we view pop culture...we now have this discerning power," she explained.

"We all have Tumblrs, we curate imagery every day. We can sniff out bullsh*t faster."

Lorde considers it her responsibility to be very honest about her state of being at any given time.

The songstress isn't moved by music industry stereotypes, and she honours musicians who pave their own way.

"I'm drawn to women who aren't painted in history as sweet figures. Patti Smith was prickly. She was frustrated. She didn't take people's sh*t. There's no better music idol for young women, because there is a lot of pressure for us to be really positive all the time," Lorde said.

"Every photo shoot I do, I get asked for big smiles, and I shouldn't have to be that way."

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