Vinyl making a comeback

Last updated 05:00 19/04/2014
Roger Liddle
ON ROTATION: Roger Liddle of Southbound Records thinks vinyl is here to stay.

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Vinyl records may be retro but they are in the middle of a resurgence.

Today is International Record Store Day and Roger Liddle of Southbound Records in Auckland says the event has grown over the years into something really special.

"It's probably bigger than the lead-up to Christmas for us," he says.

Independent record stores around the country have special vinyl releases to coincide with the day and some have live music.

Southbound Records has performers playing as well as an outdoor area where people can come along and celebrate everything vinyl.

Liddle has seen an increase in vinyl sales in recent years.

"It's not just the older generation," he says.

"There is a whole younger generation that is right into it. Some middle-aged men buy Harley Davidsons, some buy turntables.

"It is just a wonderful thing, taking an LP home, you can read the liner notes and you get a nice piece of art.

"There is the whole process of putting it on the turntable and putting the tone arm on the record and hearing the clarity as well as the whole breadth of sound - the way it was recorded."

Auckland's Real Groovy, one of the country's best known independent record stores, is also involved and will have popular Kiwi band The Phoenix Foundation playing live.

Co-owner Marty O'Donnell says the day has global significance.

"It's a movement that was started in the United States and it just kinda grew."

O'Donnell is amazed at the knowledge young record buyers have.

"One of the most gratifying things is the 15-year-old kids in the store after school or on weekends talking so informatively about new and old vinyl," he says. 

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- Auckland City Harbour News

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