Christchurch to get a fringe festival

ABBIE NAPIER
Last updated 05:00 31/07/2014
Sam Fisher and Jordan Jones
MAKING IT HAPPEN: Sam Fisher and Jordon Jones are keen to see fringe in Christchurch.

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Post-quake Christchurch is all about the creative, the ambitious and the unusual. This year, a group of enterprising Cantabrians is looking to take that a step further and capitalise on the city's newfound sense of adventure.

Christchurch is getting a Fringe Festival.

Organiser Sam Fisher says the festival will bring with it all the weird, wacky and wonderful stuff fringe-lovers have come to expect.

"It's been talked about for a while, so this year we thought we would make it happen," he says.

A fringe festival is all about showcasing the acts and performances you might not usually go to. It makes them a little more accessible and celebrates some very creative ideas.

On the cards could be a film about Haitian voodoo.

Fisher says this year is all about getting some momentum behind the idea. The group organising it has little to no funding and there is a lack of good performance venues post-quake.

"We're the only large city in New Zealand that doesn't have a fringe festival," he says. "We're enjoying putting it together a bit randomly and it's going to be all about fun."

There will be theatre shows, performance, comedy and a sprinkling of film. The best part is, anyone can apply to be a part of it.

Fisher is taking applications already - from proper theatre groups, dance troupes and even schools.

While the festival is being run on a shoestring budget and will be non-profit, performers are welcome to charge entry fee for their shows and make money off the event.

Fisher says the lack of venues means not only are they on the hunt for acts, they're also short of space. Anyone with some space to lend is encouraged to get in touch.

The festival is scheduled to run from October 13-31 this year.

For more information and to apply for a space or donate a performance venue, see chchfringe.co.nz.

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