Bogan doco gets green light

SIOBHAN DOWNES
Last updated 19:27 01/08/2014
Dave Snell

BOGAN: Dave Snell studied bogan culture for his doctoral scholarship.

Relevant offers

TV & Radio

Danielle McLaughlin: The Trump whisperer, fake news and Acosta accosted What We Do In The Shadows ripped off by UK gambling ad TV series Doctor Doctor answers calls for a country drama Ten questions for The Bachelor NZ's Zac Franich Game of Thrones creators drive fans wild with season 7 set photos 'Beaut bonzer!' Robert Irwin is a hit once again on The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon The truth is still out there as X-Files returns for new season Beyond the Battalion: Kiwi film-maker's tribute to little-known 1970s documentary reveals hidden love story Journalist Helen Kapalos quit her job to investigate medicinal marijuana Fargo: TV that tells the truth in Trump's post-truth world

He was given $100,000 of taxpayer money to study bogans, and now more than $300,000 more has been awarded to a documentary presenting the work of "Boganology Doctor" David Snell. 

The 10-part documentary for TV2, Bogans Heroes, was among the latest funding decisions to be announced by NZ On Air.  

It will feature Snell, a self-proclaimed bogan who made global headlines in 2007 when he was awarded a doctoral scholarship worth $96,000 to study the "everyday bogan's identity and community amongst heavy metal fans" at Waikato University. 

When contacted by Fairfax Media, Snell said he could not yet discuss the series for commercial reasons. 

Producer Nigel Snowden of Workhouse said: "At this stage it is all still commercially sensitive and the programme hasn't even been made." 

According to Snell, a bogan was a person who was into heavy metal music, who generally wore jeans and a (heavy metal band) T-shift, and who had an affinity with the “working class”. 

At the time, his research was dismissed by many as being a waste of money. 

Among his critics was former Port Waikato MP Paul Hutchison, who said he would “wait with bated breath” to see how it transformed the economy. 

But the Waikato Times defended Snell, running an editorial arguing his thesis would contribute to a better understanding and knowledge of a sector of New Zealand society. 

Snell’s research coincided with the success of bogan television show Outrageous Fortune. 

Ironically, NZ On Air announced this week funding would be granted to a prequel of the show, to be called West Side Story. 

At the opposite end of the spectrum, Kiwi classic Country Calendar will be back on TV One next year to celebrate its 50th year. 

It is New Zealand’s longest-running TV programme, and the second longest-running programme in the world. 

Also receiving funding was The Big Ward, a documentary following obese people as they confront their health issues and make drastic decisions to gain control of their lives. 

Meanwhile on Prime, a new documentary called Forensics: The Science Behind The Truth would show how Kiwi forensic scientists solve real crimes. 

On TV One, The DNA Detectives would use cutting-edge technology to take a group of New Zealanders on a journey to discover who they are and where they come from. 

New series House Hunters would show house buyers and the challenges they face trying to enter the property market. 

FUNDING

- The DNA Detectives received $1,045,671 for six episodes on TV One

- Forensics: The Science Behind the Truth received $1,019,124 for six episodes for Prime

- House Hunters received $686,799 for 10 episodes on TV One

- The Big Ward received $433,996 for 10 episodes on TV2

- Country Calendar received $425,036 for 30 episodes on TV One

- Bogans Heroes received $321,902 for 10 episodes on TV2


Ad Feedback

- Stuff

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content