Emmys review: Sixties out, CIA in?

02:46, Sep 25 2012
Emmys 2012
Mad Men - 17 nominations in 15 categories
Emmys 2012
Hatfields and McCoys - 16 nominations in 15 categories
Emmys 2012
Hemmingway & Gellhorn - 15 nominations in 15 categories
Emmys 2012
Downton Abbey - 16 nominations in 14 categories
Emmys 2012
Saturday Night Live - 14 nominations in 13 categories
Emmys 2012
Sherlock - 13 nominations in 13 categories
Emmys 2012
Boardwalk Empire - 12 nominations in 12 categories
Emmys 2012
Game Change - 12 nominations in 12 categories
Emmys 2012
30 Rock - 13 nominations in 10 categories
Emmys 2012
Breaking Bad - 13 nominations in 11 categories
Emmys 2012
Game of Thrones - 11 nominations in 11 categories plus Interactive nomination
Emmys 2012
Homeland - 9 nominations in 9 categories
Emmys 2012
The 84th Academy Awards - 8 nominations in 8 categories
Emmys 2012
Modern Family - 14 nominations in 8 categories

Have the '60s gotten boring? Has the CIA become sexy?

Or have we gotten weary of looking back, albeit stylishly, at our collective past, and are now eager to face our precarious present and perhaps scarier future?

Or were Emmy voters, like fashionistas awaiting the new collections, just a little restless and ready for change?

Heidi Klum
Hey, Heidi Klum, Angelina Jolie called. She wants her leg back.
Ginnifer Goodwin
Ginnifer Goodwin arrives at the Emmy Awards in Los Angeles.
Anna Chlumsky
Remember little Anna Chlumsky, Macaulay Culkin's sidekick? She's all grown up now!
Glenn Close
Glenn Close looks more like benign granny than bunny boiler these days (albeit a very stylish one).
Amanda Peet
Is Amanda Peet having a wardrobe malfunction? No, she's just making sure her dress is still attached at the back.
Peter Dinklage
Game Of Thrones star Peter Dinklage arrives at the Emmys.
Giuliana Rancic
Presenter Giuliana Rancic veers dangerously close to the lollipop look - when your head is too big for your tiny body.
Hayden Panettiere
Hayden Panettiere does her best Statue of Liberty impersonation.
Sofia Vergara
Is Sofia Vergara auditioning for a role in The Little Mermaid? Or maybe The Little Mermaid Goes To Vegas?
January Jones
Mad Men star January Jones looks, well, a bit mad in this get-up.
Kelly Osbourne
Kelly Osbourne matches her dress to her hair and her ring to her nails, but those tattoos don't go with anything.
Ashley Judd
Yep, Ashley Judd is going to kill her hairdresser when she gets home. Not to mention whoever added the bow to the back of her neck.
Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore is a ray of sunshine in this lively number.
Nicole Kidman
Nicole Kidman and Keith Urban both try smiling as hard as their surgeons' handiwork allows.
Michelle Dockery
Michelle Dockery, wearing a dress that appears to be made from a pair of curtains from Downton Abbey. So much harder to dress well without one's maid, don't you think?
Lena Durham
Oh dear, Lena Durham has obviously been taking 'how to look awkward on the red carpet' lessons from Kristen Stewart. As for the dress...
Padma Lakshmi
Padma Lakshmi sweeps past the person who dared step on her train.

It's perhaps foolhardy to draw any broad cultural lessons from the Emmy awards - but that doesn't mean people don't try. And there were a few themes emerging a day after the ceremony, in the most surprising news of this year's awards, AMC's Mad Men was dethroned in rather spectacular fashion, losing all 17 awards it was nominated for and replaced by Homeland as best drama.

Sure, Homeland, the Showtime thriller about a bipolar CIA agent trailing an Iraq war hero whom she suspects is working for al-Qaeda, has been much praised for its writing and its stellar cast, led by Claire Danes and Damian Lewis (both acting winners yesterday).

But was there something broader at play? TV critic and analyst David Bianculli was struggling with that thought, saying he was drawn to "this really nice idea that one show, teaching us about our present by focusing on our past," was making way for another show, Homeland, which was "focusing on our present and showing us our future."

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Emmy 2012
Actor Damian Lewis accepts the award for outstanding lead actor in a drama series for his role in Homeland.
Emmy 2012
Gideon Raff (L), Howard Gordon and Alex Gansa (R) accept the award for outstanding writing in a drama series for Homeland.
Emmy 2012
Producer Jerry Bruckheimer holds the award for outstanding reality competition show for The Amazing Race.
Emmy 2012
Julia Louis-Dreyfus accepts the award for outstanding lead actress in a comedy series for her role in Veep.
Emmy 2012
Jon Cryer accepts the award for outstanding lead actor in a comedy series for his role in Two and a Half Men.
Emmy 2012
Steven Levitan kisses presenter Kathy Bates as he accepts the award for outstanding directing in a comedy series for Modern Family.
Emmy 2012
Presenters Kat Dennings and Jon Cryer hand out the award for outstanding supporting actress in a comedy series to Julie Bowen (R) for Modern Family.
Emmy 2012
Louis C.K. smiles as he accepts the award for outstanding writing in a comedy series for his show Louie.
Emmy 2012
Aaron Paul accepts the award for outstanding supporting actor for a drama series for his role in Breaking Bad.
Emmy 2012
Actress Claire Danes accepts the award for outstanding lead actress in a drama series for her role in Homeland.
Emmy 2012
Actor Eric Stonestreet accepts the award for outstanding supporting actor in a comedy series for Modern Family.
Emmy 2012
Julianne Moore gives a thumbs down sign after winning the award for outstanding lead actress in a miniseries or movie for Game Change.
Emmy 2012
Tom Berenger accepts the award for outstanding supporting actor in a miniseries or movie for his role in Hatfields & McCoys.
Emmy 2012
Jessica Lange accepts the award for outstanding supporting actress in a miniseries or movie for her role in American Horror Story.
Emmy 2012
Kevin Costner accepts the award for outstanding lead actor in a miniseries or movie for Hatfields & McCoys.
Emmy 2012
Director Jay Roach accepts the award for outstanding directing in a miniseries or movie for Game Change.
Emmy 2012
The cast and crew of Modern Family, winner of the award for outstanding comedy series.
Emmy 2012
Producers and actors, including stars Many Patinkin and Clair Danes (C), from the drama series Homeland.

But he wasn't sure he believed that. It could simply be, he noted, "this natural inclination of people just wanting to gravitate to something new." That was the feeling of TV historian David Brooks, who noted that the Emmys "are a matter of what's hot at the moment."

Not that Emmy winners change every year, of course - Mad Men had won the best series Emmy four years running. But what it ran into, added Brooks, a former executive at Lifetime, was a show that was managing both to capture the current zeitgeist - it is, after all, an election year, and Homeland delves into politics as well as national security and terrorism - and to say something weighty.

"Emmy voters like to reward the 'big statement,'" said Brooks. "They like the big subjects."

What is precisely the "big statement" of Homeland? To Showtime president David Nevins, who was basking on Monday in the glow of his network's first series Emmy win, it's not just the obvious connection between the show and current events, although that's part of it. (And some of that was unplanned; the second-season trailer shows anti-American protests overseas, scenes that were filmed before the attacks on the US Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, that left the US ambassador and three other Americans dead.)

"The show has a very intense relevance to the world that we live in, and that adds greatly to its watercooler effect," Nevins said in a phone interview. "But it's also topical and political in less obvious ways. The politics of the show are complicated. Is it coming from the right? The left? What is it saying about America's position in the world? It's not obvious." And that, he said, means it can resonate for both sides in a polarised country.

It's undeniable that the Homeland buzz was greatly enhanced by the news that none other than President Barack Obama is a big fan. "You don't expect the commander in chief to be watching your spy thriller," Nevins said. Even before that news, he added, "we'd already heard that people in the intelligence and diplomatic circles were watching."

Fair enough, but Mad Men, the stylish series about 1960s-era America through the prism of an advertising firm, has its own rabid fan base. And the series was considered to have had a very good season. They were surely shocked at the show's declining Emmy fortunes.

They weren't alone. "I was flabbergasted that Homeland won," said Tom O'Neil, the editor of the Gold Derby website, which follows awards shows. He added that it was particularly surprising that Mad Men, instead of setting a happy record by winning a 5th consecutive best drama award, set a dubious one by losing all 17 awards it was nominated for.

"What's really astounding is the abrupt renunciation of Mad Men," he said. "Nobody thought their record would be the shutout record."

O'Neil's best cultural explanation? "The Emmys frequently want their winners to be weighted with meaning," he said. "Homeland is a highly stylized thriller that says something important about our time."

On top of that, O'Neil added, is the sophistication factor - which he also calls the "snob factor."

"One thing you can count on with Emmy voters is that they are elitist snobs," said O'Neil. Remember the much-awarded Frasier? "That was about two elitist brothers squabbling over things like wine."

So Homeland, O'Neil said, weaves sophisticated subject matter into an exciting thriller, with a snapshot of America today - all during an election year. How could voters resist?

One thing all analysts agreed on was the way in which these Emmys signalled the failure of the big broadcast networks, in the area of drama (In comedy, by contrast, ABC's Modern Family remains triumphant, winning its third Emmy)

"Think of how ashamed of themselves the broadcast networks must be," noted Bianculli, editor of the TV Worth Watching website and a teacher of film and TV at Rowan University. "Cable used to have its own awards because it wasn't good enough for Emmys. Now it's the broadcast networks that aren't good enough."

But back to those mourning Mad Men fans - analysts were not at all convinced that the AMC series was on a real decline. And they pointed out that in a year or two, Homeland could even seem old.

"Something else could come along, making a big statement, and shove it aside," said Brooks. "There is nothing like the glow of the new."

AP