Director actually against downloads

Last updated 16:19 28/02/2013
Game of Thrones

SMALL WONDER: Game of Thrones proves popular with pirates.

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It was a brief comment about piracy at the Perth Writers Festival that caused an international media stir including reports in Forbes and the Huffington Post.

Freelance director David Petrarca, who has worked on popular television shows including Game of Thrones and True Blood, was speaking last weekend on a panel about the rise of premium cable television channels and their challenge to novels as a storytelling format.

Answering a question about Game of Thrones being the most pirated show of 2012 and the fact that 10 per cent of those downloads came from Australia, Petrarca said he did not think the downloads affected the overall success of the show.

But after Petrarca said some media had taken the comments out of context to make it look like he condoned illegal downloading, he clarified he's absolutely against the illegal downloading of any content.

"I am 100 per cent, completely and utterly against people illegally downloading anything," he said.

Petrarca said his point was that the downloads demonstrated that the shows were in such high demand that people were willing to go to great lengths to find ways to watch them, particularly in countries like Australia where the shows were not seen for some time after they aired in the United States.

"A buzz is created by the fact that so many people want it," he said.

Petrarca said he hoped people would one day be able to legally obtain programs from anywhere in the world and not be limited by where they were.

"It is my hope that technology will find a way to take care of the piracy issue," he said.

"Nobody wins by illegally downloading content.

"I think most people would be willing to pay for a show they love."

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- AAP

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