CNN's Reza Aslan eats human brain with cannibal sect in Believers

Reza Aslan, host of CNN's Believer, has caused a stir after his bizarre encounter with members of the Aghori, an extremist sect of Hindu nomads in Varanasi, India.

CNN presenter and professor of religions Reza Aslan ate human brains during an encounter for his show, Believers

In a meeting with the rare Hindu sect Aghori, Aslan took part in a ritual that involved covering himself in the ash from human pyres, and consuming a small piece of human remains. 

During the encounter, which aired on his show, the Aghori leader becomes enraged at Aslan's questions and threatens to cut his head off. 

Reza Aslan has been criticised for demonising Hinduism with an episode of his show believers, that focused on a small ...
Frederick M. Brown

Reza Aslan has been criticised for demonising Hinduism with an episode of his show believers, that focused on a small sect of of the religion that practises cannibalism.

Visibly startled by the altercation, Aslan tells his film crew, "I feel like this may have been a mistake. Maybe we just... somebody distracts him and I just leave."

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An Aghori encourages CNN's Reza Aslan to eat a piece of human brain during an episode of Believers.
CNN

An Aghori encourages CNN's Reza Aslan to eat a piece of human brain during an episode of Believers.

The Daily Mail reported that the encounter also involved Aslan drinking from a human skull. 

The episode was criticised by some for demonising Hinduism and sensationalising the religious beliefs of one small sect that has been rejected by mainstream Hinduism. 

US congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard, who is Hindu, complained that the show presented a distorted view of the religion. 

"I am very disturbed that CNN is using it's power and influence to increase people's misunderstanding and fear of Hinduism," she posted to Twitter. 

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Aslan defended the show saying it was clearly a depiction of one small sect, and was not meant to be indicative of Hinduism as a whole. 

 

 

 - Sydney Morning Herald

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