Man says satirical show The Windsors threatens law and order

The Windsors parodies the British royal family.
Supplied

The Windsors parodies the British royal family.

A TVNZ 1 satirical show threatened New Zealand's law and order by mocking the royal family, a man has complained.

Perry Cameron complained The Windsors violated good taste and decency, discriminated against the royal family and violated their privacy.

But the Broadcasting Standards Authority (BSA) disagreed, refusing to uphold any of his complaints against the show.

The BSA has fielded a complaint that satirical show The Windsors offends good taste by ridiculing the royal family.
Supplied

The BSA has fielded a complaint that satirical show The Windsors offends good taste by ridiculing the royal family.

The Windsors is a British comedy series that parodies the British Royal Family with reference to topical events.

READ MORE:
The Windsors' Morgana Robinson on her 'cheeky' parody of Pippa Middleton
TV Review: Upstart Crow, The Windsors

Four episodes aired on TVNZ 1 in December last year. The episodes featured exaggerated characters based on members of the British royal family, with Princes William and Harry portrayed as barely-literate idiots, and contained offensive language and sexual material.

TVNZ upheld an earlier complaint from Cameron about the first episode in the series, because it didn't play a pre-show warning about the adult content.

In his complaint to the BSA, Cameron argued that the show as "likely to offend or disturb a significant section of the audience" and therefore violated free-to-air TV code's good taste and decency standard.

"Crude 'entertainment' and critical satire of the Royal Family, based on fiction, remains inappropriate for public broadcast," he said.

Ad Feedback

He acknowledged that while sedition was no longer a crime in New Zealand, it should not be tolerated in the media.

He said the programme denigrated and ridiculed Her Majesty the Queen and her family, and it breached their privacy.

The BSA did not find any of these complaints valid.

It said the right to freedom of expression included the right to satirise public figures, including heads of state, and pointed out that The Windsors was rated adults-only and screened in an appropriate 8.30pm broadcast slot.

The Windsors was found not to have breached the royal family's privacy because it presented clearly fictionalised versions of family members. Mocking the royals was not a crime, the BSA said.

 - Stuff

Ad Feedback
special offers
Ad Feedback