Accounts of the deep earn geologist award

Last updated 05:00 27/11/2010
Cornel de Ronde
CLIVE RALPH
DEEP MATERIAL: GNS principal scientist Cornel de Ronde has been awarded the 2010 Prime Minister's Science Media Communication Prize.

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Making discoveries in one of Earth's most remotest places, and then telling the rest of the world about them, has led to a Wellington scientist scooping a Prime Minister's Science Prize.

GNS principal scientist Cornel de Ronde has been awarded the 2010 Prime Minister's Science Media Communication Prize.

He won a $50,000 prize and a further $50,000 for furthering his skills.

Dr de Ronde, a marine geologist, researches the deep sea and has been involved in surveying and studying more than 150 submarine volcanoes.

He manages the multimillion-dollar Mineral Wealth of New Zealand science programme and has helped create a new field of research focused on the hydrothermal vents associated with underwater volcanoes.

The MacDiarmid Emerging Scientist Prize went to Auckland scientist Donna Rose Addis for brain research.

She works on learning how imagination is lost or impaired when the brain is unable to tap into its memory bank, and her research could lead to new therapies for diseases like Alzheimer's.

The Science Teacher Prize was awarded to Steve Martin, from Howick College, whose development of a virtual classroom has enabled him to deliver online lessons via the school intranet.

The Future Scientist Prize went to Bailey Lovett, 17, from Bluff. Her research into water quality and shellfish contamination resulted in Environment Southland changing its recommendations around harvesting of shellfish after severe weather events.

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- The Dominion Post

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