The food of the future is hopping, flying and crawling in your backyard right now

Danny Campbell, 13, from New Plymouth tried the delicacy of insects served by a top Wellington chef.
ANDY JACKSON/Fairfax NZ

Danny Campbell, 13, from New Plymouth tried the delicacy of insects served by a top Wellington chef.

One of Wellington's top chefs has made a flying visit to New Plymouth to demonstrate just how delicious a future of bug eating will be.

His dish of the day was a pork bun, except the pork was replaced with mealworms and garnished with crickets, grasshoppers and ants. 

The chef, Jacob Brown of the Larder restaurant in Wellington, was cooking as part of the Bugs! Our Background Heroes exhibition at Puke Ariki museum on Sunday.

Bella Stainthorpe, 9, thought crickets were very, very crunchy.
ANDY JACKSON/Fairfax NZ

Bella Stainthorpe, 9, thought crickets were very, very crunchy.

He said although he didn't eat bugs every day, or regularly serve them at his restaurant, he "100 per cent" believed they were the food of the future. 

READ MORE: 
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"This is what we need to look at in the future, we're going to have to have sustainable food because at the moment the way we farm is not really sustainable," he said. 

Jacob Brown cooked a medley of mealworms, crickets, grasshopers, and ants for people to try in New Plymouth on Sunday.
ANDY JACKSON/Fairfax NZ

Jacob Brown cooked a medley of mealworms, crickets, grasshopers, and ants for people to try in New Plymouth on Sunday.

He served the bugs with ginger, garlic, shallots, coriander, with a bit of hoisin sauce and sesame oil - and the results were all positive. 

Danny Campbell, 13, had eaten a huhu grub and stick insect in the past, for reasons he couldn't remember, but said these bugs tasted far better. 

"It tastes like crispy pork from a Thai place," he said. 

The main meal of the afternoon was a mealworm bun; similar to a pork bun, but the pork is replaced with insects.
ANDY JACKSON/Fairfax NZ

The main meal of the afternoon was a mealworm bun; similar to a pork bun, but the pork is replaced with insects.

Although admitting he couldn't eat a whole plate, the 13-year-old thought we could all live off them in the future.

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Bella Stainthorpe, 9, also enjoyed the delicacy, and told Brown how tasty the mealworms were and that the crickets were "very, very crunchy". 

Brown wasn't there to force people to eat the bugs, or change their diet, but instead called it an experience to help people "think about food differently" and encourage the idea of eating sustainable foods such as insects. 

Jacob Brown runs Wellington's highly rated larder restaurant with his wife Sarah Bullock.
Cameron Burnell/Fairfax NZ

Jacob Brown runs Wellington's highly rated larder restaurant with his wife Sarah Bullock.

"You think about it, there's already two to three billion people that eat them every day as part of their diet," he said.

"Except for the western world, we haven't got with it yet."

The chef said the bugs work well as an additive to a meal and were like a protein supplement. 

 - Stuff

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