Artist portrays feminist icons as Disney Princesses

Princess Malala Yousafzai "Defiant Princess"
1 of 5David Trumble
Princess Malala Yousafzai "Defiant Princess"
Princess Rosa Parks "Equality Princess"
2 of 5David Trumble
Princess Rosa Parks "Equality Princess"
Princess Anne Frank "Holocaust Princess"
3 of 5David Trumble
Princess Anne Frank "Holocaust Princess"
Princess Gloria Steinem "Trailblazer Princess"
4 of 5David Trumble
Princess Gloria Steinem "Trailblazer Princess"
Princess Jane Goodall "Jungle Princess"
5 of 5David Trumble
Princess Jane Goodall "Jungle Princess"

What happens when real-life feminist icons are given the Disney-princess treatment?

Artist David Trumble has provided the answer.

His latest work is a collection of satirical cartoons that portray women such as Gloria Steinem, Anne Frank, Rosa Parks and Malala Yousafzai as glittery, mega-watt glamazons on par with Cinderella and Ariel.

Trumble's work is jarring, but that's the point: this series demonstrates just how reductive the 'princessification' process is, and highlights the absurdity of the idea that heroines must fit a certain mould.

Citing the furore surrounding Disney's "princessification" of Brave's Merida as inspiration, Trumble told Women You Should Know that he "wanted to analyse how unnecessary it is to collapse a heroine into one specific mould, to give them all the same sparkly fashion, the same tiny figures, and the same plastic smile." 

He says the women he has chosen to depict are "far more than the homogenised, pouty guises I have drawn them as, and I wanted to make a point about society's tendency to over-use this archetype."

Trumble, who collaborated on the project with psychologist Lori Day, also says he's well aware that the images are polarising.

"I am not waging a war on all princess characters, rather I am trying to make the case that our real world is more diverse, filled with so many different archetypes for young women to find role models in, so why then do we paint all of our fictitious female role models with the same brush?"

So what do you think? Is he getting his point across with these images?

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