Five tips for going vegan

RACHEL CLUN
Last updated 05:00 08/02/2014
beyonce
Beyonce.com
GO VEGAN: Well it's certainly suiting Beyonce.

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There's no denying it - Beyonce looked smoking hot in her Grammy Awards performance with husband Jay-Z last month.

It's believed the 32-year-old singer has shed more than 30 kilos since the birth of her daughter Blue Ivy in 2012, thanks in part to a 22-day vegan challenge she undertook with husband Jay-Z before Christmas.

Beyonce apparently felt so great afterwards that she is reportedly doing the vegan challenge a second time.

"The diet was incredibly hard on her," a source told British magazine Look. "But along with the muscle tone created from a tough workout she devised with her trainer Marco Borges, she couldn't believe how great she felt without having any extra weight."

Nutritionist and Chef Zoe Bingley-Pullin says there's been a huge increase in interest in the vegan diet.

"I think more and more people are wanting to actually feel that sense of health that's not just about weight loss," says Bingley-Pullin.

Nutritional Edge founder Bingley-Pullin has helped us pulled together a list of top five tips and tricks for people wanting to be like Queen Bey and go vegan.

Number 1: Take it slow

"Please take into consideration that Beyonce probably had her food made for her every day," says Bingley-Pullin.

Don't have unrealistic expectations about overhauling your entire diet in one day, and try to change things gradually instead.

"Progressive changes are much more sustainable," says Bingley-Pullin.

She suggests changing breakfast first, then focus on changing your snacks the next week. By changing your diet this way Bingley-Pullin says changes in the way your body reacts to food will also be more obvious.

Number 2: Make it healthy

It can be hard to get enough protein on a vegan diet if you don't eat the right foods says Bingley-Pullin, so make sure the foods you're eating include a good protein source.

"Good quality grains and legumes, like quinoa and lentils are a fabulous source of protein," says Bingley-Pullin.

She says the best approach to keeping it healthy is to make sure you're getting the most out of everything you eat.

Nuts are a great source of good fats, and you can get the vitamins and minerals you need from a mix of vegetables, grains and legumes.

Number 3: Work through the cravings

It's normal to experience some cravings when you make big changes to your diet. Bingley-Pullin says if you're eating a well balanced vegan diet you're cravings are more likely to be about habit.

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"We often crave the comfort element in our diet," says Bingley-Pullin, "but if you've planned your diet well you shouldn't crave."

She says good planning will make it easier to resist the doughnuts and within three days you'll begin to notice changes.

Number 4: Make it fun

If you make it fun, Bingley-Pullin says, you're more likely to be successful in sticking to the diet.

Look to the internet for fun recipe inspiration as well. Websites like the Post Punk KitchenVegan Latina and the Australian website Veggieful.com all have a huge variety of meals that will stop you getting bored with the same recipes.

Number 5: It's down to you

"There's not one formula that fits for everybody, so you've got to find one that suits you," says Bingley-Pullin.

Keeping a food diary will help you figure out what foods do and don't work for you, and setting food goals will help you stay on track.

In the end, says Bingley-Pullin, don't make it too hard for yourself.

"It's about having a positive relationship with food," says Bingley-Pullin. "It's meant to be a fun process."

- Sydney Morning Herald

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