Mountain house maximises a steep slope gallery

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The EFH Groth house in Lofer, Austria, designed by LP Architektur, sits on a steep slope that provides spectacular mountain views. The area is popular with visitors who come for the whitewater rafting in summer and the skiing in winter.

The asymmetrical roof follows the gradient of the slope, enhancing the sense that the house might slide down the hill at any moment. The austere black timber cladding is relieved by large cut-outs and windows.

A series of steps and platforms lead up the hill to the front door of the house.

Timber shutters can be slid across the windows and openings when the house is closed up, or the weather turns bad.

The house is built over three levels and features a simple, pared-back interior.

Black and light wood finishes make up the monochromatic palette on the interior - the stairs are a visual link with the exterior.

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Many homes in New Zealand are built on steep sites, but few would look as dramatic as this new house in Lofer, Austria, which looks as though it's about to slide down the hill.

Austrian firm LP Architektur designed the house over three levels, but these have been disguised by the austere black timber cladding and a roofline that mimics the gradient of the slope.

The architecture is characterised by its pared-back simplicity, which is a stark counterpoint to the majestic grandeur of the setting. The only defining features on the exterior are the windows and cut-outs, which can be closed off with large sliding timber shutters.

The asymmetrical roof of the EFH Groth house follows the gradient of the slope, enhancing the sense that the house might ...
LPARKITEKTUR.AT

The asymmetrical roof of the EFH Groth house follows the gradient of the slope, enhancing the sense that the house might slide down the hill at any moment. The austere black timber cladding is relieved by large cut-outs and windows.

The design team says the loggias at the front and rear of the house form an interface with the surrounding environment, allowing the interior to flow effortlessly to the outdoors.

READ MORE
* Grand Designs cliff-hanger prototype
* Owners' blog of a new build on steep site

 

On the interior, black reappears in the stairs, fireplace and furniture, contrasting with light wood to create a bold, monochromatic palette.

The area is popular with tourists who come to enjoy the mountain scenery, skiing in winter, and whitewater rafting in summer.

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