One of New Zealand's oldest and most remote holiday homes up for sale

The 1012-square-metre freehold property can sleep 12 and is serviced by a diesel generator and rainwater tanks.
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The 1012-square-metre freehold property can sleep 12 and is serviced by a diesel generator and rainwater tanks.

The last time this remote South Island bach was on the market, New Zealand troops were fighting in World War II.

But after 75 years in his family, co-owner Peter Bowmar believed now was the right time to give it up.

"Well of course, it's a reluctant sale, but the reality is that it's time for the next generation to come along," Bowmar said.

The three-bedroom property, inland from Martins Bay, is accessible by boat, air or on foot using the nearby Hollyford Track.
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The three-bedroom property, inland from Martins Bay, is accessible by boat, air or on foot using the nearby Hollyford Track.

"It's fairly straight-forward, really. It's one of the most unique properties in Fiordland National Park."

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The idyllic waterfront home is nestled amongst some of the South Island's most picturesque locations.
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The idyllic waterfront home is nestled amongst some of the South Island's most picturesque locations.

The three-bedroom traditional Kiwi bach nestled on the shores of Lake McKerrow, inland from Martins Bay and is one of only 25 privately-owned sections within Fiordland National Park.

The only way to get there is by air, boat or by walking along the nearby Hollyford Track.

Bowmar believed the sheer remoteness of the location was the property's biggest drawcard.

One of New Zealand's oldest and most remote holiday homes in Fiordland National Park is being put up for sale.
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One of New Zealand's oldest and most remote holiday homes in Fiordland National Park is being put up for sale.

The property had a rateable value of $200,000 as of September 2015.

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Bayleys Cromwell salesman Gary Kirk admitted that the property's remote location might prevent possible buyers from attending open homes. 

"By the same token, it's utter remoteness is what makes this place so appealing," Kirk said.

The bach is located in an area called Jamestown, which was founded in the 1870s on the shores of Lake McKerrow near the bottom of the South Island's West Coast. 

The Government of the day proposed building a paper mill, ship building industry, mining operations, and 100 homes.

But after seven years of inaction, the handful of Jamestown residents abandoned their homes and headed back to civilisation. 

Since then, nearly all of the original Jamestown structures and sections have been reclaimed by the park's lush podocarp rainforest.

The remoteness means flying in by helicopter or by using your own boat from Milford at less than two hours crossing the Martins Bay mouth. The nearby Hollyford track provides access to the Hollyford Lodge. Fixed wing aircraft landing is also available, and is only a short boat trip down Lake McKerrow to the 'paradise' dwelling. 

 - Sunday Star Times

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