From house of worship to family home: Take a look at these church conversions gallery video

HOMED

Take a look inside two repurposed churches

Once the foundations of urban life, over the last century thousands of factories, warehouses and churches were abandoned as city residents moved out to suburban neighbourhoods.

Now, as people are returning to urban centres, these buildings are finding a new lease of life. Warehouse loft conversions began about 50 years ago, when cash-strapped artists sought out places where they could both live and work.

In cities like London and New York, churches are the new warehouses. In the wake of declining attendance and financial strain, regional diocese are deconsecrating churches and residential developers are snatching them up. With ornate detailing, fine timbers and substantial architecture, it's no wonder these former houses of worship are becoming sought-after properties.

READ MORE:
* Best church conversions provide inspirational homes
* Fancy converting a church? There are plenty to choose from
* Ill health forces the sale of a Canterbuy church conversion


 

St Peters Church and Academy was built in 1858. In 2005, like a lot of churches around Brooklyn, the historic structure went residential. A two-bedroom condo in the building is up for sale and you wouldn't necessarily guess it's located inside a former church.

Built in 1858, this Brooklyn New York church has been converted to a condominium building.
COMPASS

Built in 1858, this Brooklyn New York church has been converted to a condominium building.

The unit lacks details like stained glass which you often see in church conversions and it's got a fun, modern aesthetic that feels more "hipster" than "house of worship." 

All the period details remain in a chapel that was once part of the Edwin Denison Morgan III estate in Old Westbury, Long Island. The estate was designed by the great Stanford White in the late-19th century, and now its chapel is on the market.

With cathedral ceilings, stained-glass windows designed by noted artisan John La Farge, and a wealth of original light fixtures and ornately carved timber, the $4.5 million price tag seems pretty reasonable.

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The main living room has high ceilings, and refurbished timber floors.
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The main living room has high ceilings, and refurbished timber floors.

The interior of the church was fully gutted, so these condos have a more contemporary look.
COMPASS

The interior of the church was fully gutted, so these condos have a more contemporary look.

On the upper level, a few hints of the original architecture remain.
COMPASS

On the upper level, a few hints of the original architecture remain.

This two-bedroom condo is on the market for around $2 million.
COMPASS

This two-bedroom condo is on the market for around $2 million.

The former chapel of a Long Island estate is now a one-of-a-kind home.
DOUGLAS ELLIMAN

The former chapel of a Long Island estate is now a one-of-a-kind home.

All the details remain intact in the former chapel of the Edwin Denison Morgan III estate.
DOUGLAS ELLIMAN

All the details remain intact in the former chapel of the Edwin Denison Morgan III estate.

The master bedroom has all the modern amenities, plus an impressive period fireplace.
DOUGLAS ELLIMAN

The master bedroom has all the modern amenities, plus an impressive period fireplace.

The upper level is full of incredible details, with more stained glass and carved wood.
DOUGLAS ELLIMAN

The upper level is full of incredible details, with more stained glass and carved wood.

These stained glass windows were designed by artisan John La Farge in the late 1800s.
DOUGLAS ELLIMAN

These stained glass windows were designed by artisan John La Farge in the late 1800s.

 - Homed

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