An empowering alternative to Barbie

ROB MORAN
Last updated 10:07 30/07/2014
Dolls
Miss Possible

ROLE MODELS: The 'Miss Possible' dolls and corresponding interactive apps are designed to show girls all sorts of different ways they can change the world.

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Despite Mattel's recent attempts to expand the scope of Barbie from 'dream girl' to 'professional entrepreneur' by giving her a smartphone, an office-appropriate ponytail, and a LinkedIn account, it's understandable that many young girls might still be wishing for an alternative to the classic pin-up doll.    

Enter Miss Possible, a new line of dolls and interactive apps created by two 20-something college students from the US, with the aim of inspiring young girls with real-world role models.

"Girls are continuously bombarded with messages about what they can and can't do," write creators Supriya Hobbs and Janna Eaves on the product's website.

"Miss Possible wants to shake up what opportunities girls see for themselves by showing them women who succeeded in many fields."

The line's first series of dolls focus on the areas of science, technology, engineering and maths ("because those fields are in dire need of more women," say Hobbs and Eaves), including such icons as Nobel Prize-winning chemist Marie Curie, 19th-century computer programming pioneer Ada Lovelace, and the first African-American aviator Bessie Coleman. 

Hobbs and Eaves are currently looking to expand the project via the crowd-funding site IndieGoGo, and giving backers the opportunity to choose the next Miss Possible doll.

Always dreamed of a plush version of Jane Goodall? Chess icon Judit Polgar, perhaps? Head to the website, and make your suggestion.

- Daily Life

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