Jools Oliver: I check up on Jamie

Last updated 11:52 10/07/2012
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POWER COUPLE: Jamie and Jools Oliver, pictured on a rare night out together.

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Jools Oliver has revealed she regularly checks up on celebrity chef husband Jamie to make sure he's not cheating on her.

Oliver, 37, has told a British newspaper that she goes through her husband's phone, email and Twitter accounts to check that that he is not being unfaithful.

"He says I'm a jealous girl, but I think I'm fairly laid-back, considering," she said.

The couple have been married for 12 years and have four children - Poppy Honey, 10; Daisy Boo, nine; Petal Blossom, three, and Buddy Bear, 21 months.

In 2008 Oliver claimed her husband was unlikely to cheat on her. "I am very secure. People say 'Oh you can't trust a man 100 per cent,' but I'm afraid I say I can," she said.

"They say every man will have an affair, but I really don't think mine will. Actually, I know he won't."

Jamie Oliver, who began cooking at his parents' pub while he was still at school, is worth an estimated NZ$292 million thanks to a culinary empire which includes cookbooks, a magazine, restaurants and a cookware range. He plans to open 14 Jamie's Italian restaurants in New Zealand.

His wife hinted that her anxiety about his fidelity was in part caused by his long absences away from home.

"I understand what he is doing a bit more now. Before, maybe I was a bit naïve, and I thought it was all about me and the children. How could he leave me to go and help people in America? Now I do see. But there are still times when I say, 'I don't care, I just want you home'."

 

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