Body image issues start scarily early

Last updated 15:46 01/07/2014
SOMETHING'S WRONG: Children are worrying about their weight before they even hit a double digit birthday.

Related Links

Lena Dunham talks body image An awesome ode to body image

Relevant offers

Well & Good

What's it like to train with a Navy SEAL? The woman diagnosed with cancer a day before her wedding Photos: Marilyn Monroe, the yoga master Fact or fiction: Can we die from a broken heart? Sonny Bill Williams undergoes hijama cupping therapy YouTubers Nina and Randa say they cured their acne with a fat-free vegan diet Should we really chew each mouthful of food 32 times? Which diet is best: Low-fat, low-calorie, or low-carbohydrate? Young guy's stuttering video depicts devastating effects of party drugs Top fitness trends for 2016: Goodbye bootcamp, hello wearable tech

Kids as young as eight are dissatisfied with their bodies, a study shows.

And the majority of 10- and 11-year-olds are trying to control their weight.

The report by the Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) examined more than 4000 children around Australia at ages eight to nine and again at 10 to 11.

It found more than half of all the children they spoke to wanted a body size a bit thinner than the average, but younger kids were the most dissatisfied.

"Compared to 10- and 11-year-olds, a large number of eight to nine-year-old boys and girls were dissatisfied with their body size with many children wanting to be thinner than the average body size," said Ben Edwards, executive manager of AIFS' longitudinal study for Australian children.

But Dr Edwards said the "good news" in the research, was finding that as the children got older they were more accurate in gauging their right body size and more likely to be happy with it.

However, while the older children were more likely to be happier about their weight the majority of the older aged children had tried to manage their weight in the past 12 months.

The report said 61 per cent of boys had taken steps to control their weight in the past year, compared with 56 per cent of girls.

Dr Edwards said many boys were trying to add muscle mass, rather than decrease weight, unlike girls who were mostly concerned with losing weight.


Ad Feedback


Recipe search

Special offers
Opinion poll

Do you believe eating superfoods makes you healthier?

Yes, I feel so much better when I eat them.

No, it's all a con.

I don't know, I can't afford them.

Vote Result

Related story: (See story)

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content