Gwyneth discusses post-natal blues

Last updated 09:44 30/04/2012
gwyneth
Getty Images
CONSTANT BATTLE: Gwyneth Paltrow has spoken about her struggle with post-natal depression, saying that she believes it never goes away.

Relevant offers

Well & Good

New study shows HPV vaccine has reduced rates of genital warts A pregnant woman thought she needed glasses. But doctors found a brain tumour instead Auckland woman's life stolen to set up online relationship with American boxer Spear fisherman spreads the word around the world Barber shop donates profits to epilepsy campaign after child dies of seizure Olympic medallist takes to life on Auckland's North Shore like a duck to water Fish oil supplements don't make for better brains in children, study shows Salt to blame for late night toilet visits - study Porirua's Keith Maynard says oranges and painting are the secret to a long life Dr Libby: 4 common health mistakes and how to correct them

Gwyneth Paltrow was "mortified" when her husband Chris Martin suggested she was suffering from post-natal depression.

The actress began experiencing symptoms of the illness following the birth of her son Moses in 2006.

Paltrow said she couldn't understand why she was struggling because she had felt so happy when her daughter Apple arrived in 2004.

The star's musician spouse realised she wasn't coping and broached the subject with her.

"I couldn't connect with my son the way that I had with my daughter and I couldn't understand why," she said on US TV show The Conversation with Amanda de Cadenet.

"I couldn't connect to anyone. I felt like a zombie. I felt very detached.

"I just didn't know what was wrong with me. I couldn't figure it out. It never occurred to me. My husband actually said, 'Something's wrong. I think you have post-natal depression'. I was mortified. 'No I don't!' And then I started researching what it was and the symptoms and I was like, 'Oh, yes I do.'"

Paltrow said she believes that "you never totally get rid" of post-natal depression.

However, the 39-year-old actress found it easier to cope after she opened up about her condition. She said she hoped to help other sufferers by discussing it in public.

"That's why I talk about it, because even the awareness of it started to diminish it. Because I didn't feel like I'm dying or I'm crazy - period," she added. "It's like, 'Oh, this is a thing. This is a real thing and these are the symptoms and I have them all.'

"We think that it makes us bad mothers or we didn't do it right, but it's like, we're all in this together. I never understand why mothers judge other mothers... It's like, 'Can't we all just be on each other's side?'"

Ad Feedback

- Cover Media

Comments

Recipe search

Special offers
Opinion poll

Do you believe eating superfoods makes you healthier?

Yes, I feel so much better when I eat them.

No, it's all a con.

I don't know, I can't afford them.

Vote Result

Related story: (See story)

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content