Nipples banned from TV breast cancer ad

MICHAEL DALY
Last updated 09:46 01/10/2013
ScottishGovernment

An innovative breast-cancer campaign produced by the Scottish Government, deemed unsuitable for New Zealand TV.

NZ Breast Cancer Foundation ad

Opinion poll

Which is the more effective breast cancer awareness ad?

The Kiwi ad

The Scottish ad

Vote Result

Related Links

Watch the ad on YouTube A survivor's guide to breast cancer Breast cancer in men Bizarre Bras for breast cancer research Scottish breast cancer awareness ad NZ Breast Cancer Foundation ad

Relevant offers

Well & Good

Should you take nutrition advice from your personal trainer? 10 things you need to know about iron Stress as a killer: Is it all in the mind? Australian researchers are a step closer to a peanut allergy vaccine Why I'm addicted to exercise but don't care about my abs Why women are sharing their clothing size on social media The 7 biggest lies holding you back from happiness E-bikes the new transport movement My friends say it's not safe to run alone - but I do it anyway Depression: The women's health issue no one talks about

Kiwi prudishness has complicated the Breast Cancer Foundation's adaptation of a Scottish advert credited with a massive increase in breast cancer awareness in Scotland.

The foundation said it had to find creative ways to get its message across after the Commercial Approvals Bureau told it nipples were not allowed in television advertising.

The foundation had been considering a New Zealand adaptation of an advert made last year for the Scottish Government featuring actress Elaine C Smith.

The Scottish advert highlighted some of the lesser-known symptoms of breast cancer "beyond a lump", and  led to a 50 per cent increase in the number of Scottish women consulting their doctor about possible breast cancer symptoms.

Constrained by the "no nipples" ruling, the foundation said it had worked with agency Colenso BBDO to develop The Naked Truth campaign, in which strategically-positioned pot plants, balloons and cupcakes illustrated symptoms such as skin changes, changes in size, and redness.

The campaign will screen throughout October, urging women to report any changes to their doctor and inviting them to visit new website www.anychanges.co.nz, for more education.

"Around half of the breast cancers in New Zealand are first detected through a symptom that the woman notices," foundation chief executive Van Henderson said.

"Yet only five per cent of women are aware that puckering or dimpling of the skin can be a symptom, and only two per cent know an inverted nipple may mean breast cancer. We believe the importance of knowing all the signs and symptoms far outweighs the CAB's concern, and we wanted women to know exactly what those signs look like."

Edinburgh woman Janet Brodie has said the Scottish advert saved her life. She went to her doctor after seeing the advert as she realised she had some of the signs of breast cancer. Five tumours were found and the 54-year-old is now in recovery after having two operations, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The campaign had been straight to the point, leaving no doubt what she was looking for.

The Bureau is separate from the Advertising Standards Authority. It is an industry body with, according to its website, the purpose to "protect the reputation of broadcasters and minimises compliance risks for advertisers by vetting all television ads before they are broadcast". 

WARNING SIGNS: This graphic shows some of the symptoms of breast cancer.

Ad Feedback

- Fairfax Media

Comments

Recipe search

Special offers
Opinion poll

Do you believe eating superfoods makes you healthier?

Yes, I feel so much better when I eat them.

No, it's all a con.

I don't know, I can't afford them.

Vote Result

Related story: (See story)

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content