BREAKING NEWS
Gene Wilder, star of Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, dead at 83 ... read more ... Read more
Close

Cheaper sunscreens work better

SIOBHAN DOWNES
Last updated 15:38 06/12/2013
Sunscreen

LOOKS CAN BE DECEIVING: Consumers often pay for a label that has nothing to do with what is inside the bottle.

Related Links

The lazy girl's guide to sun protection The shocking face of sun damage

Relevant offers

Well & Good

Six ways to keep moving while you watch TV Celebrity chef and Paleo advocate Pete Evans makes unscientific claims about osteoporosis Salt content of instant noodles 'worrying', researchers say Older people embracing patient portals Why using social media at work can prevent burnout Survey shows iPads can be better than sedatives for kids in hospital Coastguard Taranaki geting new home for equipment to speed up response times Texting your way to a fitter, healthier life Food focus should be on quality, not food type, say nutrition experts In 18 months, Michael Beck lost 18kg, ran a marathon, changed his attitude about life

Sunscreens available at the supermarket offer better protection than more expensive brands, Consumer NZ has found.

Consumer NZ tested 10 popular brands from supermarkets, pharmacies and health stories to see if they met their claims of water resistance.

Banana Boat Ultra SPF50+, Cancer Society Active SPF50+ and Nivea Sun Kids Swim & Play SPF50+ were the top sunscreens recommended by Consumer NZ. 

These brands were also some of the cheapest. Banana Boat cost $6.75 per 100ml, Cancer Society $11, and Nivea $12.66.

All offered "very high" SPF protection after four hours in water, and broad-spectrum protection.

SPF measures protection from sunburn caused by UVB radiation, while broad-spectrum sunscreens protect against UVA rays which cause premature aging.

The most expensive brands, Soleo Organics SPF30+ and Surfersskin SPF30+, at $38.38 and $19.96 per 100ml, were found to provide "moderate" protection, and Sufersskin offered no broad-spectrum protection. 

Consumer NZ chief executive Sue Chetwin said with some sunscreens, consumers were often paying for a label that had nothing to do with what was inside the bottle.

"That's why it's really good to know these three relatively inexpensive sunscreens that are at supermarkets have topped the tests."

The Cancer Society recommends 35ml for a full-body application, to be reapplied every two hours - which means a 200ml bottle might only last a family of four a day at the beach.

But it's a small price to pay to look after your skin, Cancer Society marketing manager Fiona Mawley said.

"You are paying for our brand name as well, but we've been around a long time and have great community support, so we're really proud of that."

Ad Feedback

- Stuff

Recipe search

Special offers
Opinion poll

Do you believe eating superfoods makes you healthier?

Yes, I feel so much better when I eat them.

No, it's all a con.

I don't know, I can't afford them.

Vote Result

Related story: (See story)

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content