Paleo diet is latest weight loss fad

ABBIE NAPIER
Last updated 05:00 10/01/2014
Dieter Kendra Liggett
JOHN KIRK-ANDERSON/Fairfax NZ
TRIED EVERYTHING ELSE: Kendra Liggett has now started the Cohen’s Diet.

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The annual battle of the bulge is back and 2014 promises to be yet another year of extreme measures to shed that spare tyre.

Last year, fasting was arguably the top of the diet pops.

Thanks to a 2012 British documentary, fasting, or calorie-restriction diets, were set to be the ultimate cure for muffin tops and love handles and their associated health problems.

Followers of the popular 5:2 calorie-restriction diet eat normally five days a week, with two non-consecutive fast days in between - 500 calories for women, 600 for men.

After the 5:2 came the 4:3, a more extreme version of fasting.

This year, fasting is still likely to be popular but the paleo diet is catching on, and fast becoming a lifestyle movement rather than just an eating plan.

Put simply, paleo eaters stick to grass-fed meats, seafood, fresh fruit and vegetables, eggs, nuts and seeds. Some cafes are beginning to cater to paleo eaters as the diet requires less reliance on convenience foods and prepackaged meals.

Cantabrian Kendra Liggett has settled on the Cohen's diet as her weight-loss programme of choice. Cohen's markets itself as a personally tailored "balanced-eating plan" based on blood tests and consultations.

An eating programme is then tailored to the individual and is based on natural foods without the need for pills or weight-loss shakes.

Liggett said she took up Cohen's after trying the Ashy Bines Clean Eating method, the Gabriel Method, eating gluten-free, a personal trainer and going to the gym six times a week.

She is hoping to get to a healthy target weight for her height.

Rosie Stephens said she and her husband were giving the Greenlane Hospital diet a go.

The true origin of this diet is shrouded in mystery and urban legend, but is believed to have been founded by medical practitioners.

The diet aims for rapid weight loss.

According to internet websites promoting the diet, it was developed as a last-ditch method for ensuring pre-surgery patients lost sufficient weight to be safely operated on.

Followers of the three-day crash diet consume a small amount of specific foods over three days, with promoters claiming a 4.5 kilogram weight loss over the three days.

About 43,000 Cantabrians are Weight Watchers members.

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- The Press

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