Biolytix separates solid waste from liquid for irrigation

ELTON RIKIHANA SMALLMAN
Last updated 16:29 07/10/2017
TOM LEE/STUFF

Biolytix general manager Karl Geiseler believes his company leads the world in wastewater systems.

TOM LEE/STUFF
The Biolytix wastewater system separates black and grey water from solid matter.
ELTON RIKIHANA SMALLMAN/STUFF
Outdoor furniture makers Chris Morrison, left, and Evan Kennedy from Raglan company Four Leaf.

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A revolutionary septic tank is on the cusp of taking the world by storm.

The Biolytix wastewater system, on display at the Waikato Home & Garden Show in Hamilton from Thursday to Sunday, is already making strides in Fiji, Rarotonga and has interests in India, according to general manager Karl Geiseler.

"We've made mistakes over the years, but we truly believe, now, we are a worldwide leader," Geiseler said.

Geiseler, a former drainlayer, and three partners have 150 years of experience in the wastewater industry between them and have been developing the product for three years.

READ MORE: It's a dirty job but Motueka's Kevin Thian is not septic on it 

They secured the intellectual property and the international manufacturing rights in 2011.

The Biolytix system reinvents the septic tank, he said.

Waste from the household toilet is captured at the top of a series of filters while the black water and grey water trickle through the system. 

Tiger worms devour 90 per cent of the solid waste, turning it to liquid and other macro- and micro-organisms.

The filtered water, captured in the bottom of the tank, is pumped out and used to irrigate paddocks, lawns and gardens, or is emptied into the public wastewater system.

There are models suitable for baches, residential homes, farms and large-scale multiple-unit dwellings.

"Anything that is not connected to the city sewer we can deal with," he said. "We are doing a six-star complex called Vunabaka in Fiji. It's got 70 residential houses, a hotel complex and restaurants."

Biolytix won a contract in Rarotonga to help prevent contamination to Muri Lagoon. As a result, the company set up a manufacturing plant with a local company on the Pacific island.

The firm is also working on a six-star complex in Fiji and has installed systems at an eco-retreat at Glenorchy near Queenstown.

"We got a government aid contract to upgrade all of the residential houses on Muri Beach and now we are going to do the whole island."

More than 600 million people around the world have no access to clean water, Geiseler said, and 500m people use "open defecation".

On a 2016 trip to India with John Key while he was prime minister, Geiseler spoke with a number of interested parties.

"We're pretty excited about that."

Another business looking to expand, Raglan outdoor furniture makers Chris Morrison and Evan Kennedy, from Four Leaf, said events like the Waikato Home & Garden Show are essential to pick up summer sales.

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"This is when all of the outdoor furniture starts moving, so we are hitting all of the shows before Christmas," Morrison said. 

"It's about getting your brand out there, but you've got to make the sales as well."

Morrison uses macrocarpa slabs to make custom-made outdoor furniture and has been building for three years.

"I always knew how to put stuff to together and was always going to start my own business, so I thought I'd start young."

"Macrocarpa is good. It's like H3 treated pine without the chemicals. In 10 years, it is still going to be a piece of wood and there is still going to be a connection to it."

North Port Events general manager Rebecca Stewart said up to 30,000 visitors were expected at the four-day show at Claudelands Event Centre in Hamilton.

Statistics from the 2016 event show visitors purchased or intended to purchase $140,659,032 in food and product.

"This year, we have already received very positive reports from our exhibitors about the number of new leads they are generating, products selling out and conversations with new and existing clients," Stewart said.

- Stuff

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