Man strangled and terrorised ex

EMMA HORSLEY
Last updated 12:00 20/11/2012

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A self-described monster throttled his ex-girlfriend and held her captive in a room in what a judge described as a prolonged and horrific attack that could have had tragic consequences.

Samuel Mark John Frickleton, 22, saw red when his ex-girlfriend destroyed a piece of artwork he had given her as a gift.

In a frenzied rage, he pushed her on to her bed, placed his hands around her throat and started to squeeze, a Palmerston North District Court heard yesterday.

The Palmerston North man squeezed tighter as his victim begged for her life and tried to escape.

When she finally managed to break free Frickleton stopped her leaving the room, took her mobile phone and held her against her will for two hours.

Judge Morris told Frickleton he was lucky he wasn't facing a charge of kidnapping.

In her statement, Frickleton's victim said she feared for her life.

"You lost control but in those two hours you had a chance to deflect and desist and you chose not to," Judge Morris said.

"You terrorised your victim for two hours."

Frickleton's lawyer Mark Alderdice said his client considered himself a monster and had seen something in himself he didn't like.

He said Frickleton, a third year medical science student, had written a letter of apology to his victim, had undergone extensive counselling and had emerged a model student.

After describing the assault as an extremely dangerous and prolonged act that could have ended tragically, Judge Morris sentenced Frickleton to four months' home detention and counselling.

"Your lack of previous convictions, your guilty plea and your success at counselling show me you have put your heart and soul into making things right.

"You are not a young man without hope."

Judge Morris said she hoped the event was an eye-opener to Frickleton about what he was capable of.

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- Manawatu Standard

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