Teen leads festive show

Medieval Christmas comes to town

LEE MATTHEWS
Last updated 12:00 03/12/2012
Flavour of Christmas
DAVID UNWIN/Fairfax NZ

CHRISTMAS CRACKER: Nina Donkin is working through rehearsals for her new production The Flavour of Christmas. From left are David Mock, 16, Nina, 16, Grace Smith, 6, and Emily Good, 18.

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A medieval Christmas show, complete with a banquet for the audience, is being put together by two Palmerston North teenagers.

Sixteen-year-old Nina Donkin, whose Family Friendly Productions theatre company last year produced and performed the musical Psalty, has gone a step further this year.

With help from her friend and stage manager 18-year-old Emily Good, Nina has written and choreographed The Flavour of Christmas, incorporating the 20-minute play The Reluctant Dragon by John Rutter.

The show will be presented as a medieval banquet, with the audience served a full Christmas dinner during the production. Catering is being done by Dot Costley, using All Saints church's new community hall facilities.

Nina said the music for the show was particularly lovely. Nina's mother, Palmerston North singing teacher Debbie Donkin, was musical director and working with the 16-strong four-part choir to produce interesting music.

The music was not just voices - the show would also feature a string quartet, trombone, recorders and guitar pretending to be medieval lutes. The guitars will be played lute-style, across the players' laps, instead of upright.

"I loved doing Psalty last year, I learned so much directing that. And we got such a positive response to a show that was truly family friendly that I decided I'd like to do something again this year," Nina said.

Nina, who is home-schooled, is also dancing in the show, and will sing solo. She is working for her Associate in Trinity College London in singing.

The Flavour of Christmas will be at All Saints community centre December 13 to 15. Tickets are available from TicketDirect.

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- The Manawatu Standard

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