Letters : Whistleblower

Last updated 09:25 11/02/2013

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Recycle water

Regarding the story about the Blenheim sewerage upgrade ["It's all go for $17m sewage upgrade", Marlborough Express, February 6], I would like to know why the council has not gone into recycling water, instead of pumping out the water into the waterways then out to sea.

With less rainfall and less water available, having to introduce water restrictions, more cities and countries are upgrading to recycling their treatment plants for recycling water.

It's a win-win.

ANDREI IWANOW

Blenheim

Whistleblower

Thank you Elizabeth Della Bosca [letters, Express, February 7] speaking out for the whistleblower and against bullying in the work place.

I am very proud to be a New Zealander but I feel, as a nation, we often let ourselves down. If a problem does not affect us personally then we just leave it alone. This applies right across the board.

The teachers are suffering from a form of bullying. I cannot imagine any parliamentarian putting up with a defective pay system if they were affected personally.

I cannot understand why the new system was introduced if it was not proven to be 100 per cent good to go. Even John Campbell from Campbell Live found it difficult to get a definitive answer.

Those who should be responsible are somehow exempt from blame.

Across the Tasman, the Australian sports world is in turmoil over doping. Has the Australian Government quashed the story, has the Australian Government hidden behind a veil of false respectability? No. It is tackling the problem head on.

I wish the New Zealand government and we New Zealand citizens would step out of our comfort zone and help those who really need protection from bullying and, especially those who are prepared to stand up and fight for the rights of others.

Let us not be armchair generals but concerned warriors fighting to help the whistleblower who is the conscience of the nation, who is just fighting the injustices in our society.

Remember one little girl from Pakistan was not afraid to stand up for the rights of education for girls in her country.

DIANE CAGNEY

Blenheim

Alcohol promotion

Recent local newspapers have had numerous photos (some on the front page and mostly of women) depicting people promoting alcohol consumption.

Because alcohol is a mind and mood-altering drug of addiction and, if recently discovered, would be banned. It is distressing to see so much space given to it. Such photos and articles should be banned. Marlborough should produce food for a hungry world, not alcohol.

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Of particular concern is the fact that some women and girls have still not got the message that if pregnant, or planning a pregnancy, they should not drink any alcohol because of the risk of the baby being born with foetal alcohol spectrum disorder, for which there is no cure.

ELAINE HADFIELD

Blenheim

Two halves

Give me strength. Nelson weatherman John Mathieson ["Marlborough continues to feel the heat", Express, February 4] says Blenheim's weather has been a season of two halves. We're lucky it didn't have three.

Same page, ute rolls at Marfell Beach intersection, SH1. Isn't there a give way sign there? Slow down and look.

LAURIE HAM

Blenheim

Novel review

The purpose of book reviews is to indicate to what extent they may have to a particular or general readership. In the case of my novel The Two Deaths of Pluto [reviews, Saturday Express, February 2], this was not addressed.

Neither for that matter was the storyline, nor how the characters and settings serve the story. Perhaps the book was not even read, as everything the reviewer had to say can be found in the author's note, author's bio and cover blurb.

The purpose of my spy-thriller was to portray the mechanics of carrying out on-the-ground surveillance, and not just the successes and excitement but the tedium, stress and at times the fallibility of such operations. Using the Kim Dotcom saga to open the review was extraneous as that involved electronic eavesdropping.

This non-review was an insult to the more than three years I spent in writing my novel (with the help of such acclaimed writers as Charlotte Randall and Owen Marshall).

As a former reporter for your newspaper I expected a far more professional standard.

DON STEPHENS

Christchurch

 

- The Marlborough Express

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