Opinion: Ross Taylor's dismissal so shabby

JONATHAN MILLMOW
Last updated 05:00 08/12/2012
Ross Taylor
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TOUGH TIME: Ross Taylor says playing for his country is his passion and he will return once he feels ready.

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OPINION: Ross Taylor was not the greatest captain but he deserved better.

His fate was sealed when Mike Hesson stepped into the head coach role - blind Freddie could see that.

We waited for Taylor's execution day - the time was right after a series of tactical flaws at the Twenty20 World Cup in Sri Lanka - but Hesson missed his cue.

When Hesson pounced, he was more Frank Spencer than Seb Coe. He fluffed his lines, confused himself and his credibility took another hit.

Few cricket experts have a problem with the outcome, just the way New Zealand Cricket went about it.

You have to take your hat off to Taylor for his performance in the second test victory against Sri Lanka in Galle. To have your heart ripped out by the coach and then shove it back in his face must have been a bittersweet experience.

In most organisations heads would roll for such a calamity but NZC is at sixes and sevens and it is unlikely Hesson, chief executive David White or board chairman Chris Moller will walk the plank.

Hesson and White are new to their roles but Moller joined cricket from rugby with a wonderful reputation that is sadly now in tatters. Given the board's lack of cricket knowledge, the calls for someone like former NZC chief executive Martin Snedden to replace Moller will only intensify.

As for Taylor, his problem was his inability to think quickly on his feet as a limited overs captain.

Tests gave him more time to think but in the crash and bash format he was often found wanting. The Twenty20 World Cup saw players gravitating to Brendon McCullum when key decisions were required.

Taylor's backers point to his batting statistics but runs are not in question here, it is his ability to lead the side and to a lesser extent his abilitiy to communicate on the same level as them.

Good judges say McCullum adapts quickly on the field and will make a good fist of the role. Expect him to try things like no skipper in recent memory.

Like Taylor, he is prone to speaking gobbledegook when a camera or microphone is thrust under his nose, but we can live with that.

McCullum starts on the backfoot. People see him as a spoiled brat, getting everything he wants and seldom delivering anything of note with the bat.

In truth he is a likeable bloke, with the full backing of his players - not to mention his coach.

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So, it's the end of unfortunate week.

Our hearts are with Taylor and we await his next knock.

A standing ovation might be on the cards when he walks to the crease, not for his batting or the way he has conducted himself over the past couple of weeks but for being wronged by a sport that he has given a lot to.

- © Fairfax NZ News

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