Hack a Tesla Model S, win $10,000

STEPHEN OTTLEY
Last updated 10:50 16/07/2014
Tesla Model S

CAR CHALLENGE: Hackers could win $10,000 if they manage to breach the security of the Tesla Model S.

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Computer hackers are being offered a $10,000 prize if they successfully hack into the electronic brain of the Tesla Model S electric car.

Organisers of the SyScan technology conference in Beijing, that runs July 16-17, have put up the prize money for anyone who can successfully infiltrate the car's software.

A Model S will be on-hand at the show and the organisers reportedly want to see if any hackers can manipulate either the 17-inch tablet-style central screen that controls all the car's entertainment, climate and navigation equipment, or its digital dashboard.

According to a report from Forbes, the contest does not have the support of Tesla and the organisers haven't made it clear what they will do with the information if anyone successfully hacks the car.

Tesla has a strong reputation for digital security within the industry. In large part because it hired leading ''white hat hacker'' Kristin Paget, who previously worked for Microsoft and Apple, to keep its cars safe from computer-savvy criminals.

But as digital technology continues to play a larger role in modern cars, hackers are being seen as a greater threat to the automobile.

In 2013 Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek made headlines for successfully hacking into a Toyota Prius and Ford Escape. The pair were able to override the Toyota's brakes and steering using a computer.

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- Sydney Morning Herald

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