New Ford Mustang to produce less power than a Falcon

SAM HALL
Last updated 07:10 21/07/2014

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Ford's highly-anticipated Mustang could play second-fiddle in the horsepower stakes to the Australian-produced XR8 Falcon when it lands next year.

Ford has released full engine details of the all-new Mustang range, revealing the GT version will offer 324kW of power and 542Nm of torque from its 5.0-litre V8 Coyote engine.

While impressive, those numbers aren't enough to exceed the figures for the soon-to-be discontinued Falcon GT, which produced 335kW and 570Nm and as much as 351kW/570Nm in its final GT-F guise.

While Ford could limit the XR8's output – possibly to the 315kW tune used in the FPV Falcon GS – there's a chance it will outgun the Mustang that is planned to step in as Ford's muscle car hero from 2015.

The swansong Falcon will dip out of production in October 2016, when Ford Australia ceases manufacturing.

The reason behind the power divide? Both vehicles share the same 5.0-litre V8 engine – the difference is that the Falcon's will be supercharged.

The Coyote V8 – which forms the basis for the supercharged Miami engine formerly developed by FPV and used in its GT Falcons – features a new intake manifold, revised cylinder heads and valvetrain to extract its additional power but also, Ford claims, to improve its low-speed breathing for better economy, idle stability and emission outputs.

Despite the potential power disadvantage on paper, the Mustang won't be any less exciting on the road thanks to a host of new technologies reserved for the iconic new model, including an in-built burn-out mode for drag racing and a launch control function.

If the Mustang's power outputs come as a disappointment, don't despair. Ford is believed to be working on a high-performance Mustang to replace the ougoing FPV Falcon GT on Australian roads – rated at 400kW.

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- Sydney Morning Herald

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