Vintage machinery collection a sellout

MATTHEW LITTLEWOOD
Last updated 06:36 24/02/2014
vintage auction
MARK LAWSON/FAIRFAX NZ
VINTAGE TREASURES: Punters turned out in droves to the vintage machinery auction at Geraldine on Saturday.

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Buyers from far and wide were among almost 1000 people who attended a special auction of vintage machinery in Geraldine.

Co-organiser Ben Lewis said all 330 lots in Saturday's auction at Orari Back Rd had sold.

"It was an incredible day. People from all over the place came, nothing was left by the end of it. We had bidders from England to Auckland at the place," he said.

"I don't think we will ever see that much vintage machinery in one place in New Zealand again."

All the equipment belonged to Geraldine man Ian Sadler, who began his collection soon after World War II. The auction items included stationary engines, vintage tractors and farm machinery, chaff cutters, wheels and cream cans, and his parents' 1955 Morris Oxford car, with just 62,130 miles on the clock.

Among the engines were two exceptionally rare items: a Campbell hot-tube engine, which was manufactured in Halifax, England, and first sold in 1902, and a Hornsby open-crank 6-horsepower engine on an original Reid and Grey sledge.

Mr Lewis said about $100,000 of sales were made during the auction, which was overseen by PGG Wrightson.

He said the Campbell sold for $21,000 to a New Zealander living in Australia, while the Hornsby sold for $12,500 to a bidder from Woodend.

"If it weren't for Ian [Sadler], most of these items would have been turned into scrap years ago," Mr Lewis said.

"But the response was incredible. Even items that we thought were junk went for decent money. There was nothing bought cheaply."

Most of the equipment would have been bought to restore or put on display, he said.

"We couldn't have asked for a better day; the weather was beaming, the crowds were humming and the auctioneers were really skilled."

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- © Fairfax NZ News

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