Prince William takes BBQ helm

17:58, Jan 25 2010
Prince William
TOUCHDOWN IN AUCKLAND: Prince William is greeted by Prime Minster John Key as he arrives at Auckland international Airport in Auckland. Prince William is on a three-day visit to New Zealand in his first official role for the Queen.
Prince William
PLEASED TO MEET YOU: Prince William is greeted at Auckland International Airport by John Key and his wife Bronagh at the start of his three-day visit to New Zealand. Also pictured is Governor-General Anand Satyanand.
Royal 1
ROYAL TOUR: Prince William takes in the view with All Blacks Dan Carter and Richie McCaw on the fourth level of the new stand at Eden park during his tour of the site.
Prince William sail
ON THE WATER: Prince William on board the America's Cup boat for a sail on Auckland's Waitemata harbour with Team NZ skipper Dean Barker (far right).
Prince William
CATCH: Prince William plays with boys from a Pakuranga under 10 rugby team at Eden Park in Auckland.
Prince William
ROYAL SEAT: Prince William tries out his seat at the new Eden Park stand. From left: All Black Richie McCaw and Auckland Mayor John Banks look on.
Prince William
Prince William takes in the vista from the new stand during his tour of Eden Park.
Prince William
HANGI TIME: Prince William stands over a hangi, with Governor Anand Satyanand at Government House.
Prince William
DINNER DATES: Prince William chatting to guests with a drink in his hand, prior to dinner at Government House in Auckland.
Prince William
AN EVENING WITH THE PRINCE: Prince William chats with guests at Government House before a traditional Maori dinner of a hangi on the first day of his visit to New Zealand.
Prince William
SMOKING: The prince watches the process of cooking dinner in a hangi pit.
Prince William
WHAT'S COOKING? Prince William lifts a parcel of food out of the hangi, at Government House on the first day of his visit to New Zealand.
Prince William
ALL ABOARD: Prince William takes the wheel on board the America's Cup boat for a sail on the Waitemata Harbour with Dean Barker, left.
Prince William
CHEERS, MATE: Prince William and Richie McCaw with boys from the Pakuranga under 10 rugby team at Eden Park.
Prince William
MODEL: Prince William checks out the model of the new Eden Park during his tour of the site.
Prince William
WILL IN WELLY: Prince William inspecting the troops at the National War Memorial in Wellington.
Prince William
TROOPS: Prince William inspecting the troops in Wellington.
Prince William
'WE LOVE YOU, WILLIAM': Crowds gathered outside the Supreme Court building in Wellington during Prince William's visit.
Prince William
MONARCHIST: Anthony 'The Duke' Catford at the Supreme Court in Wellington to see Prince William.
Hongi
Prince William hongis with Sir Paul Reeves after opening the Supreme Court in Wellington.
Haka
WELCOME: Prince William welcomed by a haka prior to opening the Supreme Court building in Wellington.
Prince William
'HE'S REALLY COOL': Elise MacMillian, 13, Molly Smith, 13, and Bella Ireland, 14, all students at Wellington Girls College, who got to meet Prince William in Wellington.
fans
ROYAL WATCHERS: Crowds gathered at the Supreme Court in Wellington to catch a glimpse of Prince William.
Prince William
Prince William chatting with members of the public at the Supreme Court in Wellington.
Prince William
Prince William arriving at the National War Memorial in Wellington.
Prince William - Kiwi
BIRD LIFE: Prince William held a kiwi (left) and interacted with a rogue weka during his visit to Kapiti Island.
William flags
POPULAR PRINCE: Prince William greeting the crowds in Wellington.
William hongi
GREETINGS: Prince William engages in a hongi on his tour of Kapiti Island.
Prince William and Key
POLITICIANS: Prince William (left), Prime Minister John Key (third left), and Ministers Nathan Guy and Kate Wilkinson pose during the Prince's Kapiti Island visit .
Prince William
BOAT RIDE: Prince William and Prime Mnister John Key arrive at Kapiti Island.
Prince William BBQ
HOT WORK: Prince William gets smoke in his eyes while behind the barbie with Prime Minister John Key.
Prince William and John Key
WORKING FOR HIS DINNER: Prince William and Prime Minister John Key cook beef fillet steaks on the barbie.
Prince William visiting Wellington Hospital pictured here with Ashleigh Knight 8 from Paraparaumu (R).
CHILDREN'S WARD: Prince William at Wellington Hospital, pictured here with Ashleigh Knight 8 from Paraparaumu (R).
MEET AND GREET: Prince William talked to many young patients while visiting one of the children's wards at Wellington Hospital.
MEET AND GREET: Prince William talked to many young patients while visiting one of the children's wards at Wellington Hospital.
CEREMONY: Prince William and Prime Minister John Key after unveiling a plaque in the childrens ward of the Wellington Hospital.
CEREMONY: Prince William and Prime Minister John Key after unveiling a plaque in the childrens ward of the Wellington Hospital.
HERE SOON: A mother and daughter wait for Prince William to arrive at the Wellington Hospital Children's ward.
HERE SOON: A mother and daughter wait for Prince William to arrive at the Wellington Hospital Children's ward.
Prince William's visit to New Zealand
HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS: Prince William at Wellington Airport before departing New Zealand.

His Royal Highness Prince William got behind the barbie and flipped a few sausages as part of his New Zealand summer experience this evening.

Lamb, steaks and sausages were on the menu at Premier House in Wellington this evening with the prince manning the barbecue for a while.

Earlier today Mr Key said on Newstalk ZB: "(We are) trying to give a bit of a local summer feel to an evening which hopefully will be one of fun and an opportunity for him to engage with a wide range of New Zealanders".

This afternoon he visited Kapiti Island, where he was greeted by sunshine and birdsong as well as rogue weka and takahe.

The prince - accompanied by Prime Minister John Key, local MP Nathan Guy and Kate Wilkinson - arrived around 3.30pm, and representatives of local iwi Ngati Toa Rangatira welcomed him with a mihi.

Wearing a blue sweater, khakis and sneakers, the prince heard a history of the island once home to famous Maori chief Te Rauparaha.

The royal then got the chance to hold a spotted kiwi - one of over 1200 on the island, according to DOC ranger David Wrightson.

The prince showed his good nature, joking with persistent photographers who yelled requests, even calling some of them by name. Holding the moulting kiwi, he declared "This is my date with a kiwi".

Advertisement

He posed for photographs with local college students selected to help welcome him before heading off on his private guided tour of the island.

Wellington's much-maligned weather took pity on the prince, turning on a blue sky and relatively flat sea for his trip to the island.

Two boat-loads of officials and press representatives were ferried over to the island, around 5km off the Kapiti Coast. Around 100 locals turned out to see the prince.

'WE LOVE YOU WILLIAM'

More than 1000 people turned out to see the prince in Wellington's CBD this morning.

The royal was greeted with shouts of "we love you William" as he pulled up in his convoy and more cheers as he entered the Supreme Court building following a Maori welcome.

Prince William was escorted by police and royal security and accompanied by the Prime Minister John Key.

The prince was performing his first official duty for the Queen by opening the court, an edifice that represents another severed link between New Zealand and "mother England".

The permanent home for New Zealand's highest court replaces the London-based Privy Council.

The new court, diagonally opposite Parliament, consists of two connected buildings - the 1881 High Court and the new, modern interpretation of it. Construction took just over two years and cost $80.7 million.

Speaking this morning before Prince William opened the Supreme Court building, Mr Key said New Zealand was delighted to have the second in line for the throne visit New Zealand in an official capacity.

Tackling the serious matter of opening the court building, Mr Key talked about the importance of the judiciary and its independence.

He did not touch on the irony of a member of the Royal family opening a building that houses a court replacing access to the Privy Council in England, but noted the Supreme Court was the highest appellate court in the country.

WALKABOUT

After the opening ceremony, loyal fans had the chance to see the prince during a walkabout.

The prince finished his tour of the Supreme Court building and shook hands with hundreds of members of the crowd who crammed against the railing.

Elise MacMillian, 13, Molly Smith, 13, and Bella Ireland, 14, all students at Wellington Girls College, got to meet the prince, saying he was "really cool".

"He was really nice and he's a real gentleman as well. I think he's a really good guy. I think he's really good looking as well," said Molly.

"We are so happy, this has probably been the best day of the holidays."

Kristen Clausen, who turns 10 tomorrow, also got a special word from the prince.

"He wished me Happy Birthday for tomorrow," she said.

Kristen was overwhelmed by the experience, calling the prince "charming", "very bright", "kind and caring".

Several groups of protesters including the republican movement and Ministry of Justice staff have made their presence known at the court building but overall the reception was positive.

People stood on nearby rooftops to get a glimpse of Prince William.

One woman in Lambton Quay said the wait was worthwhile.

"You only get one opportunity to see him."

Eight-year-old Jacinda Mendoza from Upper Hutt was waiting with her grandmother with a bunch of flowers for the prince.

Another young girl, Melissa Moroney, saw him have the Maori cloak draped on him.

She said it was a "once in a life time opportunity to see him in the flesh. You can't really pass that up".

Many people said they would wait until after Prince William officially opened the Supreme Court to see him again.

Retiree Alan Farquhar was a strong supporter of the monarchy and was overjoyed to see the prince.
 
"I think it's exciting. I think it's good for the country. It does a lot of good and reminds us of our heritage."
 
"I have great respect for the royal family. I think they do a great job as figureheads."
 
However, he expected that New Zealand would eventually become a republic.
 
Alice Brennan, aged 15, had come along with her sister Hannah to get a glimpse of the prince. She managed to see him arrive in the car. She said the prince wasn't as handsome as he used to be.
 
"I think as he's got older he's kind of changed a bit."

PROTESTS

Protests took place while the prince was at the Supreme Court building, with republicans, politicians and Justice Department workers championing their causes.

Jack Gielen, the deputy leader of the New Zealand Republican party, was amongst those protesting.

"We are saying bye bye Will, bye bye royal pomp."

He said New Zealand "desperately" needed a new and more equitable constitution, saying support was building for the country to become a republic.

Mr Gielen said John Key was a "puppet of the new world order."

"We need a government by the people for the people."

Two MPs, Labour's Clare Curran and the Greens' Keith Locke, along with other advocates for New Zealand cutting its ties with the British monarchy, unfurled a banner saying "It's Time For A Republic".

"We've told our supporters that this is all about a peaceful, positive protest," said Republican Movement president Lewis Holden.

"It's just us exercising our democratic rights."

Meanwhile, a group of about 30 Justice Department workers were loudly protesting an ongoing wage dispute with the department outside the court house.

Collections officer and PSA delegate Neil Raeburn said the royal visit will give protesters more exposure for their cause.

"We just want the Ministry of Justice to get around the negotiating table and come to some sort of resolution on fair pay."

The PSA said ministry workers were paid up to 13 percent less than the public service median and on average 6.3 percent less.

Court registry officer Talitha Claassens said the PSA has been protesting for months with no avail: "We are not necessarily here for Prince William, but all the people who are on the bargaining table. The Minister of Justice and the senior managers are here today."

MONARCHISTS

Staunch monarchists representing Alf's Army were there to defend the honour of The Queen's grandson.

Commanding officer John Morrison said they were there to send a message.

"The Queen still has enemies to be dealt with so we seek them out and give them a thrashing."

So far among the "vanquished" were Scottish Jacobites from the MacGillicudy clan, the Maori 'war party', Martians in Dunedin and a group of nudists.

Private James Parper said the turnout "goes to show the popularity of an undemocratically elected head of state"

The democratic process was "repulsive and absurd."

WREATH-LAYING CEREMONY

Earlier, Prince William laid a wreath dedicated to the armed forces at the National War Memorial.

The prince's Air Force plane landed in Wellington about 9.40am, following fears that his flight would need to divert to the Air Force base at Ohakea, near Palmerston North.

Only one other flight had been able to land at the airport this morning, with others diverted to Palmerston North Airport.

The prince arrived at the memorial around 10.10am, and stood on a podium while the military band played part of 'God Save the Queen'. The Air Force, Navy and Army royal guard saluted him.

Walking with his arms behind his back and wearing a double-breasted suit, he reviewed two lines of troops, coming within metres of the crowd of around 150 assembled bystanders.

Afterwards, accompanied by Mr Key and National War Memorial chairman David Ledson, the prince was introduced to military dignitaries while walking up the memorial steps and in the memorial entranceway.

Inside the memorial, where an armed military guard was stationed along the walls, the prince laid a wreath below.

Written on the wreath was: "In deep respect and grateful memory of the men and women of the armed forces who have sacrificed their lives for New Zealand and for freedom."

He stood at attention in silence, a head taller than Mr Key, as prayers were read out.

Prince William left around 10.35am, going on to represent the Queen at the opening of the new Supreme Court building.

WOWING THE CROWD

Mr Key said the prince was "a very charming young man".

"He's extremely relaxed. I found him very, very personable. I wasn't sure entirely what to expect but he's very down to earth, he's got a great sense of humour.

"I think he's got a strong sense of the responsibilities that he currently commands and those that lie before him and yeah he's just a fine young man."

Prince William will today represent the Queen at the opening of the new Supreme Court building in Wellington where protesters from the Republican Movement plan to stage a peaceful demonstration.

Two MPs, Labour's Clare Curran and the Greens' Keith Locke, along with other advocates for New Zealand cutting its ties with the British monarchy, plan to unfurl a banner saying "It's Time For A Republic".

"We've told our supporters that this is all about a peaceful, positive protest," said Republican Movement president Lewis Holden.

"It's just us exercising our democratic rights."

The prince was expected to tell the New Zealand public that the royal family was willing to serve as long as the people wanted it.

Mr Key said the republicanism debate was not something the royal family feared.

"I don't think that would be as if it's some sort of shocking revelation to him. Obviously there's discussion about republicanism around the world in places that currently still have constitutional monarchy like New Zealand. That's something that the Queen herself has said to me that she recognises there's a debate in and that's a matter... for New Zealand.

"I personally don't think New Zealand is going to become a republic anytime real soon, but it's not something that they are afraid to debate as royals."

The prince will leave for Australia on Tuesday.

- with NZPA and MICHAEL FIELD, Stuff.co.nz