Call to dump kerb tanks

MARC GREENHILL
Last updated 05:00 06/11/2012
Kerbside sewage dump stations
DON SCOTT/Fairfax NZ

DUMP IT: East Christchurch community leaders want kerbside sewage dump stations removed.

Lianne Dalziel
Fairfax NZ
CHALLENGER: Lianne Dalziel is set to enter the race for the Christchurch mayoralty.

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East Christchurch community leaders are calling for the city's kerbside sewage dump stations to be dumped.

The plastic disposal tanks have been a fixture since chemical toilets were introduced in areas with sewerage damage after the February 2011 earthquake.

However, with the infrastructure repair programme well advanced, calls for those not in use to be removed have increased.

Burwood-Pegasus Community Board chairwoman Linda Stewart said the tanks were an eyesore that attracted vandalism and graffiti.

However, there was some wisdom in keeping them in case of further quakes, Stewart said.

"As much I think it's sensible in some ways [to remove them], I think it comes down to cost. How much does it cost to remove them all?" she said.

Christchurch East Labour MP Lianne Dalziel said it was about "people's state of mind".

"For those areas where they're not needed, I think they should make it a priority to remove them," she said.

"It just adds to the sense of decay and doesn't help the sense of renewal that we're looking for."

Dalziel questioned the use of ratepayer funds for cleaning tanks not in use.

"I can't imagine anyone using them down [my street] and they're scattered all down there," she said.

A council spokeswoman confirmed every tank was emptied and cleaned regularly.

They would be removed as the residential red zone emptied and repairs in other areas were completed, she said.

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