Council sorry for CTV permit - Parker

MARC GREENHILL
Last updated 16:55 11/12/2012
Christchurch Mayor Bob Parker
Iain McGregor

BOB PARKER: 'If we need to stand up, be accountable in areas where we can be, then so we should.'

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Christchurch Mayor Bob Parker has apologised for the city council's role in signing off the faulty Canterbury Television building.

A royal commission report released yesterday found that the six-storey building, which collapsed in the February 2011 earthquake, killing 115 people, should not have been granted a building permit by the council. 

Parker said today that council staff had apologised ''early in the process'' at the commission's hearings, and he echoed those sentiments.

''It is clear, based on the evidence we have seen, there were shortcomings in those processes, but they were also one part of a very complex process that involved a number of other parties,'' he said.

''Naturally, everybody here is truly sorry. Albeit it's in an historic context, but it doesn't lessen the pain for us at this time."

The collapse was a ''tragedy beyond our understanding''.

''It's been a terrible time for those who have lost loved ones, and I imagine for many people it is an emotional pain that will be with them forever,'' he said.

The council's role in the royal commission was to not play the ''blame game''. 

''It's been to use the royal commission to be as open as humanly possible ... to ensure lessons could be learnt so that the things that led to this tragedy would never be repeated,'' he said.

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- The Press

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