Take a tour of Chch's changing centre

ANNA TURNER
Last updated 05:00 18/12/2012
Cathedral Square 2008

CHANGING CITY: Panoramic shots of Christchurch's central city can be seen by the public in the university's digital archive.

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Some of the last panoramic views of Christchurch's central city red zone have been preserved by the University of Canterbury.

A virtual tour of the red zone will be kept in the archive as a lasting reminder of so many Christchurch buildings that will never be seen again.

Christchurch’s Murray Quartly, who runs Focus360 Virtual Website Tours, has been working on a comprehensive tour of Christchurch’s ever-changing central city.

See the tours here: quakestudies.canterbury.ac.nz

He used sophisticated imaging techniques to create panoramic shots of street corners in the red zone.

Quartly has gifted the shots to the university and they can be seen by the public in the university's digital archive, QuakeStudies, from today.

"The panoramic shots provide an amazing way to see how Christchurch is changing.  Ordinary photographs help, but the 360 degree view adds a sense of being there which people seem to really value,” Quartly said.

He wanted to make sure there was a record of the change in the area.

"It is a work in progress and we aim to continue for a number of years as Christchurch recovers. I was in the 1968 Inangahua earthquake and there is no record of what the place was like before the earthquake."

Director of the archive Associate Professor Paul Millar said the university was proud to be displaying Quartly’s panorama shots.

"They provide a unique view of the impact of the demolitions and rebuild in the central city."

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- The Press

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