Cera survey reveals 'resilience'

SAM SACHDEVA
Last updated 13:03 20/02/2013
Gerry Brownlee
STACY SQUIRES/Fairfax NZ
GERRY BROWNLEE: The resilience of Cantabrians had "shone through" in the survey.
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Christchurch earthquake

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Cantabrians are split on whether officials leading the region's rebuild are on track, a Cera survey has revealed.

The Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Authority's 2012 wellbeing survey, released today, shows that 37 per cent of residents lack confidence in decisions made by those leading the recovery, while 34 per cent say they are confident.

See the full survey here.

Residents are also divided on whether they have enough influence in the earthquake recovery.

Thirty per cent said they are satisfied with their opportunities to influence recovery decisions, while 28 per cent are dissatisfied.

The Christchurch City Council is the least trusted of the central and local government agencies, with 41 per cent lacking confidence in their decision-making, compared to 27 per cent who say they are confident.

Nearly three-quarters of residents (74 per cent) said their quality of life was good, while only seven per cent said it was poor.

The ability to cope under difficult circumstances (76 per cent), increased resilience as a family (69 per cent) and a renewed appreciation of life (68 per cent) were the biggest positives that residents had taken from the earthquakes.

The biggest issues for most residents were the loss of recreational and cultural facilities (69 per cent), distress connected to ongoing aftershocks (66 per cent) and decisions about house damage, repairs and relocation (54 per cent).

Earthquake Recovery Minister Gerry Brownlee said the resilience of Cantabrians had "shone through" in the survey.

"What this shows is that despite the enormous challenges people have faced across greater Christchurch, they have battled on and continue to find positives," Brownlee said.

There was still a long way to go in terms of the physical rebuild and helping the community to recover from the impact of the quakes, he said.

The survey includes responses from 2381 residents in Christchurch City, Selwyn and Waimakariri.

Findings from the second part of the survey - open to all residents on the Cera website - will be released later in the year.

The organisation intends to conduct surveys every six months until the end of 2014 to monitor progress in the region.

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- The Press

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