Two years today, city hit by two major quakes

Where were you two years ago today?

NICOLE MATHEWSON
Last updated 14:08 13/06/2013

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Two years ago today, Christchurch was hit by a double whammy - a magnitude-6.4 earthquake and the collapse of the historic Lyttelton Timeball Station.

Lyttelton resident Nick Groves captured on film what could be the last photo of the station before it collapsed.

Groves said he took the photo at 1.02pm on June 13, 2011, as he was being lowered down by crane.

An hour and 20 minutes later, the 136-year-old building collapsed during the magnitude-6.4 quake.

The quake had followed a magnitude-5.5 shake earlier that day, both damaging dozens of central-city buildings and causing the famous rose window of Christ Church Cathedral to fall into the building.

Lyttelton's Timeball Station had been badly damaged in the September 2010 and February 2011 quakes and collapsed during the second quake on June 13, 2011, while in the middle of being deconstructed.

The New Zealand Historic Places Trust salvaged much of the materials and placed them in storage until the station could be rebuilt.

Auckland-based Landmark Inc, an organisation founded to preserve New Zealand heritage sites, made a $1 million donation to the trust last month for the station's rebuild, marking the first step towards its restoration.

The timeball has been touring New Zealand with the Canterbury Museum earthquake exhibition, and the trust is undertaking a study to determine how to rebuild the station.

No decisions are expected until later this year.

Do you remember what you were doing two years ago today when the double whammy hit? Tell us in the comments field below.

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- The Press

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