Napier killer likely to remain in jail

TALIA SHADWELL
Last updated 12:56 05/05/2014

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A Hawke's Bay killer will have been in jail almost 30 years before he can request parole again.

Sam Te Hei, 50, is serving a life sentence for the murder of 16-year-old Colleen Burrows in 1987.

She was kidnapped and kicked in an hour-long attack and then run over with a car after she refused to have sex with him and a fellow Mongrel Mob member.

In June that year, the teenage girl's body was found on the banks of the Tutaekuri so badly mutilated the police were unable initially to identify her.

Te Hei was imprisoned in November of 1987 and then was convicted again in 1996 for the attempted murder of another prisoner, for which he received a concurrent prison term of nine years.

Te Hei became eligible to request parole in 2005.

A Parole Board report dated April 22, released today, said parole eligibility postponement was being considered because when Te Hei last appeared before the board in January he was reluctant to undertake a rehabilitative programme.

At April's hearing chaired by Justice J W Gendall, Te Hei indicated he was willing to try the programme.

However the report noted Te Hei had displayed "problem" behaviour in jail and because of an absence of significant change in his circumstances, his next parole hearing was to be postponed until January 2016.

The board also noted Te Hei wished to participate in supervised public outings, but concluded that it was for the Department of Corrections to decide whether that was appropriate.

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- Wellington

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