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43 busted in crayfish sting operation

ANNA PEARSON
Last updated 13:20 29/05/2014
Crayfish
SCOTT HAMMOND
Also known as rock lobster, crayfish are a Kaikoura delicacy.

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Authorities have an illegal crayfish ring in their claws following a covert operation targeting ''recreational black marketers'' in a seaside South Island town.

The 12-month Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) operation, which involved 50 compliance officers, wrapped up today.

MPI targeted recreational fishers catching and selling rock lobster, also known as crayfish, which is illegal and punishable by up to five years imprisonment and/or a $250,000 fine.

The operation mostly focused on activities in the Kaikoura area, but also included Christchurch and Nelson/Marlborough.

Ten cars, five boats and a tractor were seized in the execution of 32 search warrants.

MPI said many of the 43 people caught during ''Op 15'' were likely to face serious charges under the Fisheries Act of 1996.

They included a restaurant in Christchurch and a food wholesaler.

MPI director-general Martyn Dunne said its job was to protect New Zealand's fisheries for future generations by making sure people were following the rules.

''As this operation would indicate... it is something we take very seriously,'' he said.

An undercover compliance officer bought 1200 cooked crayfish from recreational fishers during the 12-month operation.

MPI director compliance Dean Baigent said this, combined with other information gathered by MPI, suggested there had been a ''thriving'' black market in Kaikoura for some time.

''Recreational fishers have been fishing in a pseudo-commercial way and selling their catch to supply a large black market including locals, tourists, hotels and restaurants and businesses further afield,'' he said.

The retail price for rock lobster was about $90 per kilogram, which was usually about two rock lobster of legal size.

The recreational black marketers MPI caught were selling whole cooked rock lobster for between $10 and $15 each.

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