Jury hears of depraved abuse

LYN HUMPHREYS
Last updated 05:00 06/08/2014

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A woman endured years of violence from a man now on trial in the High Court at New Plymouth.

He would tell her humans were born to beat their women and that he would rape her mother.

She described how her hair was permanently matted because her head was too sore to use a brush.

Allan Neil Rosewarne, 48, has denied 44 charges.

The charges include five counts of rape, six of sexual violation, 11 of injuring with intent to cause grievous bodily harm, two of injuring with intent to cause grievous bodily harm, five of injuring with intent to injure, two of indecent assault, one of kidnapping a woman, three of threatening to kill, two assaults with a weapon and four of cruelty to children.

Giving evidence from behind screens, the woman, who has automatic name suppression, told the jurors of night-long cross-examinations, beatings and rapes.

The woman, who lived with him from the age of 16, said she never went to the doctor or left him because of her fear of him, his "heavy" friends and the threats to rape her mother.

In opening the case for the prosecution yesterday, Crown solicitor Cherie Clarke said Rosewarne's two partners, one who lived with him for 17 years, and the next for 20 months, were abused in a similar way.

Rosewarne met his first partner when she was only 15 and he was 24. He talked her into leaving school and moving into his Kaponga home then went about isolating her from her family and friends.

He would kick, beat and punch her any time he chose.

He raped her and forced her to have sex with friends.

Their children often heard the assaults, saw their mother's injuries and heard her whimpering in the other room.

The violence got worse in the last few years when Rosewarne was using intravenous drugs.

He cracked her head against the coal range in Whangamomona and a few days later re-opened the wound by hitting her with a glass ashtray.

She sat in the bathroom feeling the blood run down her back thinking she was going to die.

He regularly hit one of his two boys saying it was to harden him up because he didn't want him to be gay.

Another son was born nine weeks early after she began bleeding following yet another assault.

When the baby was released from the neonatal unit, they took him to his mother's Bell Block home, where Rosewarne began throwing the baby around in his car seat. She threw herself on the car seat to protect him, yelling at him to stop "and she got the beating," Clarke said.

Finally, she realised she must leave or be killed and on February 26 in 2007 found the courage to leave the Whangamomona house and her children, walking kilometres in the dark to get help at a farmhouse in Matau.

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Women's Refuge were contacted and came and got her.

In 2008 Rosewarne was in a new relationship and, following the advice of a male friend, got the solo mother hooked on drugs, injecting her to make her dependent on him.

In a few months she, too, was being hit and punched and isolated from her friends and family and sexually abused.

On October 10 the relationship ended when she ended up in hospital after one of the beatings. As a result Rosewarne was convicted of injuring her with intent.

Defence counsel Roger Crowley said the decision for the jury when hearing "repugnant" evidence was whether the violence was as serious and sustained as the Crown alleged and that each charge was proven beyond reasonable doubt.

In a case involving serious violence , sexual abuse and abuse of children and administration of drugs, the jurors should put aside any bias, sympathy or prejudice, Crowley said.

The first witness told the jury that the first time she was hit was when he decided she had not got off his motorcycle fast enough.

When she took her helmet off, "he punched me right in the face".

He apologised and said it wouldn't happen again.

She described his jealousy, telling how he said that as she didn't act like a whore, as his previous girlfriend had done, she wouldn't get the same hidings he gave her.

She told how she would be left naked on the floor after he'd forced her to have sex with her for hours against her will and how she waited for him to fall asleep so she could call the dog over to keep her warm.

The trial is expected to continue up to four weeks.

A new jury was empanelled yesterday after it was found one of the jurors chosen on Monday had a poor understanding of English.

- Taranaki Daily News

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