Driver to pay $6k to victim who lost leg

Last updated 17:35 07/08/2014

Relevant offers


Southland man loses $100,000 in internet dating scam, police warn people to be careful Defendant volunteers $3000 after crash near Blenheim kindergarten Police drop charge against man accused of Castlepoint sex assault on teen in tent Police execute large scale drug bust in Paeroa Father who had children in tow jailed for burglary Bar owner calls for action to catch attackers in Pukekohe stabbing Takeaways murder trial: 'I didn't know what I was saying' Teenagers steal Hamilton Catholic church wine, leave a trail of bottles Preliminary hearing before John Key defamation trial in February Lyree Sayers 'suicide by car' manslaughter trial resumes in Napier

A courier driver who almost severed a woman's leg with his truck has been ordered to pay $6000 to the victim.

Courier Post truck driver Shaymvedh, who only has one name, was sentenced in the Auckland District Court today after pleading guilty to one charge of careless use of a vehicle causing injury.

He was ordered to pay emotional harm reparation and disqualified from driving for six months.

Judge Phillippa Cunningham said the accident occurred on February 16 when Shaymvedh was pulling out of an address on Auckland's Richmond Rd.

He believed he had lifted up the tail gate of his truck but he had not.

A young woman jogging past went behind the truck and as Shaymvedh went forward and right the truck caught the woman between the tail deck and the wall crushing her leg.

The leg was almost severed and was later amputated.

The woman also received a compound fracture of her thigh which had to be repaired with a titanium rod and nails, the judge said.

The woman had been seriously affected by the accident and had on-going pain and phantom pain from her amputated leg.

She was also emotionally affected and could not get the sight of her severed leg out of her head, the judge said.

The accident had shaken her confidence and she was reluctant to go out as she was conscious of how she looked.

Shaymvedh told the court he had used a remote control to lift the tail and its light had flashed as it normally did when it was working.

He did not know why the tail did not lift.

A police prosecutor said the tail lift had been examined and it worked properly with all the devices that raised and lowered it.

Shaymvedh had been suspended from his job and was unlikely to get his position back, the court was told.​

The victim's name was suppressed.  ​

Ad Feedback

- Fairfax Media

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content