Drunk love affair with police ends

MICHELLE ROBINSON
Last updated 09:31 04/08/2012

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A man who made prank calls to police declaring his love for them has been told his calls put other people at risk and ''wasted an enormous amount of police time".

Mohammad Ali Mayat Baloch, also known as Mark Taylor, was yesterday sentenced at the North Shore District Court for a range of charges including misusing a telephone, drink driving, driving while disqualified, refusing a blood alcohol test, attempting to cause damage to property and trespassing.

He was sentenced to 260 hours community work and a fine of more than $700.

Judge Nevin Dawson reprimanded him for his habit of making fake calls to police.

"You've wasted an enormous amount of police time with your foolish actions. Other people are at risk if real calls come through and can't be dealt with because emergency services are dealing with the nonsense of your behaviour."

Baloch said he had a genuine respect for police after being raised in Pakistan in a military family but got in the habit of ringing emergency services when he was drunk.

He would tell them how much he loved them and what a good job they were doing and tell them jokes.

He struck the wrong operator one night and the woman told him she would only listen to his joke if he gave her his address.

It was the beginning of the end of Baloch's love affair with the police.

The self-professed joker was tracked down and arrested but he said everyone at the police station looked after him because they knew him from his phone calls.

Baloch had hoped he would be let off lightly because he was always positive and complimentary and never threatening in his calls to police communications staff.

He had previous convictions of driving while suspended, refusing a blood alcohol test and another driving related charge.

Judge Dawson warned Baloch he would face a "serious penalty" should he reappear in court for drink driving.

"You have a harmful pattern of drinking. This is the third time you've had a drink driving conviction. The community has the right to be protected from you."

Baloch received a community work sentence of 220 hours for drink driving and driving while disqualified, to be served concurrently, and an additional 40 hours for making prank calls to police.

He was fined $700 plus court costs, including $378 in reparation to Auckland Council for damage to a bus shelter. He was ordered to pay an additional $93 for medical expenses and analyst fees for refusing a blood test.

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