Collins appalled by Scott Guy TV coverage

TRACY WATKINS
Last updated 19:00 23/09/2012
judith collins
Fairfax NZ
JUDITH COLLINS: Justice Minister

Relevant offers

Crime

Police are investigating a stabbing in Nelson Arohata Prison's female inmate population has spilled out into a self-contained unit near Rimutaka Prison in Upper Hutt Home detention for man who sent woman sexually explicit texts about her daughters Million-dollar real estate agent claims losing his Aston Martin would cause 'extreme hardship' Man arrested after firing shotgun during Hawke's Bay domestic incident Mother and son reward friend's charity with kicks to the head Man arrested over burglary of Hamilton motel room after allegedly convincing staff to give him access Military 'criminals' escape real world consequences Man hospitalised after late night stabbing in New Plymouth Jonathan Milne: Is it time to take the keys from Police Commissioner Mike Bush?

Justice Minister Judith Collins has signalled a review of television cameras in court saying she was appalled by reality TV-like coverage in the Scott Guy murder case.

"I'm not comfortable with the sensationalisation of a few moments. We saw in that case where cameras were absolutely trained not only on the accused but also on his wife, on the widow of Scott Guy; that it was sensationalised to the extent that it was almost like reality television," Collins told TV3's The Nation.

"I don’t think that does justice any good."

She would review the practice as part of a broader range of work being done in the justice portfolio, but also acknowledged it was important for justice to be seen to be done.

Law Society president Jonathan Temm last week called for cameras to be banned in court because they misrepresented evidence.

Collins said she agreed it was "not good" for the justice system to have small moments of  "sensationalised recording" shown to portray a case when a jury had sat through all the evidence.

"One of the problems with the cameras used as they are is we see a tiny snippet…usually of someone about to cry or crying and frankly that does not give any indication of the evidence that a jury is hearing.''

Feilding farmer Ewen Macdonald was acquitted of murdering his brother-in-law Scott Guy.

Collins also defended the decision to withhold evidence from juries.

The jury in the Macdonald trial did not know he had pleaded guilty to killing 19 calves with a hammer, and other crimes.

''If for instance the jury had known about the appalling attacks on those little calves, I doubt whether any jury would say, 'Well actually, I can now look at that man and give him a fair hearing.' I think that would be very hard, and I think the judge made the right decision,'' Collins said.

Ad Feedback

- Stuff

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content