'Busy street-level drug dealer' goes to prison, not to Fiji

JIMMY ELLINGHAM
Last updated 12:09 15/06/2013

Relevant offers

Crime

Man shoots at police in Northland, steals police car, leads chase down country The Kim Dotcom saga is returning to court New kitchen, building tools and dive tanks worth $100k recovered by police Duncan Garner: A public child sex offender register would only encourage vigilantes Nelson Bays district police area calls in help to cope with 'serious crime' investigations Two men fined over illegal rubbish dump in Hawera Pledge to improve safety near Victoria University campus after assaults reported Bail for alleged Budget Day protester, Ken Thurston 'Heavily disguised' pair attempt aggravated robbery of Te Awa Dairy in Napier Prisoner Charles Tawha jailed for pouring boiling water on guard

A "busy" Palmerston North drug dealer has been jailed for supplying methamphetamine and cannabis, thwarting his plans to return to Fiji.

Between November 2011 and February last year, Isaiah Taukave McGoon, 41, used his cellphone to arrange deals before delivering the drugs on demand.

On 110 occasions, he supplied methamphetamine to unknown clients - a total of 11.65 grams, worth $11,650.

He also made 70 cannabis deals, selling tinnies and measured amounts of the drug.

On top of that, McGoon offered to sell methamphetamine on 30 occasions and cannabis 40 times.

McGoon admitted one charge each of supplying methamphetamine, offering to supply the drug, supplying cannabis and offering to supply it.

In the Palmerston North District Court yesterday, he was given a prison sentence of two years and 10 months.

"You were, there's no doubt, a busy street-level drug dealer," Judge Mike Behrens told McGoon.

"There was, I think, significant planning involved which adds to the seriousness of what you did."

The judge shaved time off McGoon's sentence for his guilty pleas, remorse and time spent on electronically monitored bail.

However, he ruled out home detention, which had been suggested by defence lawyer Simon Hewson.

"One of the purposes of this sentence is to make others who might think of going into the drug-dealing business realise the consequences of doing so," Judge Behrens said.

Mr Hewson said McGoon had turned his life around and had completed an alcohol and drug rehabilitation programme.

McGoon planned to return to his native Fiji, where his ageing parents lived and he owned land.

"It's important to him to pay his debt to this community and look to the future."

Ad Feedback

- Manawatu Standard

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content