Firearms evidence points to Bain's dad

MICHAEL WRIGHT
Last updated 21:53 26/06/2013
David Bain
Fairfax NZ
STILL FIGHTING: David Bain.

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Robin Bain loaded the gun used to kill his family, new evidence suggests.

His son, David Bain, was convicted of the 1994 murders his parents, two sisters and brother in Dunedin, but found not guilty at a retrial in 2009 after spending 13 years in prison

However, firearms experts tonight told TV3's Third Degree programme that parallel smudges shown on police photographs of Robin Bain's hands were consistent with marks left when reloading a rifle magazine.

The ''sooty'' coloured marks on Bain's hand appeared to be the same width as the .22 rifle magazine which, based on the number of shots fired, the experts said would have been reloaded during the murders.

Christchurch gunsmith Robbie Tiffen said .22 rifle magazines often left a ''greyish sludge'' on the thumb and forefinger of the user's dominant hand when reloading.

The residue only stayed on the hand for a short time, he said.

''If those marks are from the magazine... then you were the guy who pulled the trigger,'' Tiffen said.

Peter Durrant, a retired technical and scientific photographer who gave evidence in David Bain's defence, dismissed the possibility the marks were cuts.

Waikato businessman David Giles, who made the link after reading internet blogs about the case, believed his revelation was a ''game-changer''.

''I can't explain why anyone would have missed something as obvious as this,'' he said.

''It should have been picked up on day one of the investigation.''

During the two trials, the court heard the rifle belonged to David Bain and was kept in his room along with ammunition.

Robin Bain's fingerprints were not found on the gun.

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